Upma Kozhukattai| Kara Pidi Kozhukattai

A popular offering to the elephant-headed Lord Ganesha on Ganesh Chaturthi, the Pidi Kozhukattai is also a very healthy snack. With the goodness of rice and toor daal, it is a steamed snack made with minimal oil. It is a simple thing to make, but quite delicious and filling, which makes it great as a lunchbox filler.

Pidi Kozhukattai is a traditional Tamilnadu preparation, wherein rice flour or broken rice is first cooked in boiling water along with a few other ingredients, then allowed to cool and shaped into dumplings with the hands, after which they are steamed. Fingerprint marks on the Pidi Kozhukattai are its distinguishing feature, which lend the dish a certain rustic charm. This is how the dish gets its name too – ‘pidi‘ in Tamil roughly translates into ‘hand-held’. These steamed dumplings are often also called ‘Upma Kozhukattai‘, referring to the coarse grinding of rice in the mixer that the recipe calls for, similar to the making of Rice Upma, another common Tamil Nadu snack.

These dumplings can be either sweet or savoury, with different families making big and little variations of their own. Today, I present to you the savoury version, called Kara Pidi Kozhukattai, the way my family makes it. I made these for the Ganesh Chaturthi celebrations in our apartment this year, and they were a huge hit.

Here is the recipe for these Kara Pidi Kozhukattai, on popular demand. ๐Ÿ™‚

Ingredients (makes 25-28 pieces):

  1. 2 cups raw rice
  2. 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  3. 4 tablespoons toor daal
  4. 4 cups water
  5. 2 tablespoons oil + a little more for greasing the steaming plate
  6. 2 teaspoons mustard seeds
  7. 3-4 pinches of asafoetida
  8. 2 sprigs of fresh curry leaves
  9. 2 green chillies, chopped into large-ish pieces
  10. Salt to taste
  11. 1/4 cup fresh grated coconut

Method:

  1. Take the raw rice and toor daal together in a large mixer jar. Add in the black peppercorns. Pulse a few times, for a couple of seconds each, stopping in between to mix up the ingredients in the jar with a spoon. Stop when the ingredients are ground to a well-crushed, slightly coarse texture like rava. Keep aside.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a pan. Add in the mustard seeds and let them pop. Tear the curry leaves roughly with your hands and add them in. Add in the asafoetida. Let them stay in for a couple of minutes.
  3. Add 4 cups of water to the pan, along with salt to taste. Keep on high flame and bring to a rolling boil.
  4. Now, add the chopped green chillies and fresh grated coconut to the boiling water in the pan. Mix well.
  5. Keeping the flame on medium, slowly add the ground rice-black pepper-toor daal mixture to the boiling water in the pan. Stir constantly to avoid lumps forming.
  6. Keep cooking on medium flame, stirring constantly, till all the water is absorbed. Switch off the flame when the mixture comes together, and starts getting dry.
  7. Let the cooked mixture cool down considerably, covered.
  8. When the mixture is cool enough to handle, we will begin shaping pidi kozhukattai out of it. For this, make medium-sized oval dumplings out of the mixture, as shown in the picture above. Keep aside, covered.
  9. Use a little oil to grease a colander to steam the pidi kozhukattai in. Arrange as many pidi kozhukattai in the greased colander as you can, in a single line, keeping a little space between them. Keep them ready.
  10. Take about 1 cup of water in a pressure cooker base. Place a stand over the water. Place the cooker on high flame. Let the water in the base start boiling. Now, place the colander with the pidi kozhukattai over the stand, cover the cooker, and steam for 10 minutes without putting the weight on.
  11. Allow the cooked pidi kozhukattai to cool down slightly, and then gently transfer to a vessel/serving plate using a spoon. Handling them straight out of the cooker might cause them to break.
  12. Cook all the pidi kozhukattai in a similar manner. Serve hot or at room temperature, with some simple coconut chutney.

Notes:

  1. Adjust the quantity of black peppercorns you use, depending upon how spicy you want the pidi kozhukattai to be. You can even skip the green chillies altogether, and use only black peppercorns to add spiciness. If using green chillies, make sure you use slightly big pieces that can be easily spotted and not bit into accidentally.
  2. The rice and toor daal mixture can be ground as coarsely or as finely as you desire. I prefer not grinding them finely, but to a well-crushed, coarse texture that is akin to rava.
  3. Chana daal can be used in place of toor daal. Both versions are equally tasty.
  4. I use Sona Masoori raw rice to make these pidi kozhukattai. 4 cups of water for 2 cups of Sona Masoori raw rice is the rice:water ratio that works perfectly for us.
  5. Adjust the quantity of grated coconut you use in the kara upma kozhukattai, depending upon personal preferences.
  6. Here, I have ground the raw rice and toor daal without washing them. If you want to wash them, drain out all the excess water after you do so, then sun-dry them for about 10 minutes on a cotton cloth. Proceed with making the pidi kozhukattai the same way as above, once the washed rice and toor daal are completely dry.
  7. A colander works best for steaming the upma kozhukattai. This ensures even cooking.
  8. Stop cooking the rice-toor daal-black pepper mixture when it starts to come together and lose moisture. Do not overcook it, as this will cause the pidi kozhukattai to get quite dry. Keep the cooked mixture covered till you use it.
  9. Gingelly oil or coconut oil works best in the making of these upma kozhukattai.
  10. These upma kozhukattai can be made ahead and refrigerated. You can remove them from the refrigerator an hour or so before serving, then steam them well in a pressure cooker.
  11. Traditionally, when these upma kozhukattai are made for the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi, they are made without tasting. They are first offered to Lord Ganesha and then partaken of.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me in your comments!

I hope you will try out these Kara Pidi Kozhukattai too, and that you will love them as much as we do!

Advertisements

Postcards From Ganesh Chaturthi 2018

Spirituality. Peace. Introspection. Good food. Community. Pandal hopping. Activities with the bub. Play time. Busy-ness. Making memories. Family. Traditions.

That was how Ganesh Chaturthi this year looked like, to us.

Here are some pictures from Ganesh Chaturthi 2018, for your viewing pleasure. I’ll let the pictures do the talking now on.

*********************

Like every year, this year too, we installed a Ganesha in our apartment. Everyone got together to do the decorations, the aarti, make the prasadam for 3 mornings and 3 nights, after which the festivities ended. We did our bit too. This has now become an important tradition to us, one we don’t want to miss.
Spotted these Ganeshas in the market these year, and loved them. A closer look will reveal that they are decorated with grains like ragi and rice, then painted all over. Even the Ganesha idol we set up in our apartment was similar.
It was nice to see these eco-friendly Ganeshas, with a little pop of colour.
Dark and light. Light and dark. That’s what we are made up of too, right?
Pandal decorations, anyone?
I absolutely loved these traditional Ganeshas, with their broad trunks!
More decorations for Ganesha pandals
Meanwhile, this cute little ‘sweet’ Ganesha was spotted at Adayar Ananda Bhavan!
A pretty Ganesha pandal set up near HSR Layout. I loved how this one was done up just like a temple!
A medley of Ganeshas and Gowris in the pandal
fb_img_1537245799304-01114883233.jpeg
The Ganesha pandal set up by the HSR Layout Youth Association
Colourful, pretty umbrellas that made up part of the decorations at the HSR Layout Youth Association pandal
More Ganeshas and Gowris. Check out that cute turban!
A close-up of the Ganesha idol
More Ganesha and Gowri idols inside the pandal
A small fair set up near the HSR Layout BDA Complex, on the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi
People having fun at the fair. Kids and adults alike.
We were passing by a temple in HSR Layout, and spotted Ganesh Visarjan happening. We decided to stay on for the festivities, and thoroughly enjoyed it. Here’s Ganesha bidding adieu.
Artistes performing a traditional Karnataka folk dance form, during the visarjan
The excitement in the atmosphere was palpable. Can you feel it in the picture, too?
Ganesha all set to say farewell
Artistes performing Veeragaase, a traditional Karnataka folk dance, on the streets. I loved capturing them on camera!
This guy was all too happy to pose for my camera!
Poser!
Artistes performing Dollu Kunitha, a traditional drum dance practised in Karnataka

****************

How was Ganesh Chaturthi for you, folks?

Did you like this post? Do tell me, in your comments!

Kara Ammini Kozhukattai| Spiced Mini Kozhukattai

Today, I present to you another traditional recipe for Ganesh Chaturthi – Kara Ammini Kozhukattai or Spiced Mini Kozhukattai. For the uninitiated, these are little dumplings made out of cooked rice flour, steamed and then tempered. Very little oil is used in the preparation of ammini kozhukattai, making it quite a healthy snacking option. The tempering can be made in different ways, which gives the dish an absolutely different taste every time you make it. At home, this is quite a big favourite, and we make this often, festival times or not. Kara Ammini Kozhukattai makes for a great lunch box filler as well.

This is a popular offering to Ganesha in Tamilnadu, for the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi. Different families have different styles of tempering the ammini kozhukattai, but typically, they are made from the leftover cooked rice flour remaining after making the traditional stuffed modaks. Even if you don’t have any cooked rice flour left over, these little ones are an absolute breeze to make.

The Kara Ammini Kozhukattai recipe I am sharing with you today is my mother’s. This is the way Amma makes them, the way she taught me to. Now. let’s check out the recipe, shall we?

Ingredients (serves 3-4):

For making the ammini kozhukattai:

  1. 1 cup rice flour
  2. 2 cups water
  3. 1 teaspoon oil + more for greasing hands and steaming vessel
  4. Salt, to taste
  5. Red chilli powder, to taste
  6. 2 pinches asafoetida powder
  7. 1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder

For the tempering:

  1. 1 teaspoon oil
  2. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  3. 2 pinches asafoetida powder
  4. 1 sprig fresh curry leaves
  5. 2-3 dry red chillies
  6. 2 green chillies, slit length-wise
  7. 1/4 cup fresh grated coconut

Method:

We will begin with making the dough for the ammini kozhukattai.

  1. Take 2 cups of water in a pan, and add 1 teaspoon oil to it. Place on high flame and bring to a rolling boil.
  2. Now, lower flame to medium. Add the rice flour to the boiling water little by little, stirring constantly to ensure that no lumps are formed.
  3. In about a minute, all the water will get absorbed into the rice flour. Now, keeping the flame on medium, stir the dough for a minute more, trying to break any lumps that might have formed.
  4. Now, turn the flame to the lowest possible. Cover the pan with a lid. Let the rice flour cook for a minute, covered. Switch off gas. Allow the cooked rice flour to cool down completely.

We will now prepare the ammini kozhukattai for steaming.

  1. Ensure that the cooked rice flour we prepared earlier has entirely cooled down. Now, add salt to taste, red chilli powder and 2 pinches of asafoetida powder to it.
  2. Use your hands to mix well. Knead into a soft dough, ensuring the the salt, red chilli powder and asafoetida are evenly distributed throughout. Knead for a couple of minutes.
  3. If the dough is too sticky, you can mix in a teaspoon of oil at this stage. If not, skip this step and proceed to the next one.
  4. Grease your palms with a little oil. Shape small balls out of the rice flour dough. Keep aside, covered.
  5. Grease a wide vessel with a little oil. Keep it ready for steaming.

Now, we will steam the ammini kozhukattai.

  1. Take about 1/2 cup water in a pressure cooker base.
  2. Place a stand over it.
  3. Arrange the little balls we prepared earlier into the greased vessel you prepped for steaming. Place this over the stand.
  4. Close the pressure cooker. Steam on high flame, without placing the weight on, for 10 minutes. Switch off gas, and allow the cooker to cool down a bit.
  5. Now, remove the steamed ammini kozhukattai from the cooker and allow to cool down completely.

Lastly, we will temper the kara ammini kozhukattai.

  1. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a pan.
  2. Add in the mustard. Allow it to pop.
  3. Add in the asafoetida, curry leaves, dry red chillies and slit green chillies. Let them stay in for a couple of seconds.
  4. Now, add the steamed and cooled ammini kozhukattai to the pan.
  5. Turn flame to medium. Stir gently, mixing the tempering with the ammini kozhukattai. Take care to ensure that the ammini kozhukattai do not break.
  6. Add in the fresh grated coconut. Mix well, but gently.
  7. Cook for a minute, stirring gently. Switch off gas. The ammini kozhukattai is ready – serve hot or at room temperature!
A pictorial representation of the various steps involved in the making of Kara Ammini Kozhukattai

Notes:

  1. Coconut oil or gingelly oil works best in the making of Kara Ammini Kozhukattai. If you don’t have these, however, any other variety of odourless oil would do.
  2. You can skip adding the red chilli powder in the Kara Ammini Kozhukattai, if you plan to make these for kids, or add it a very minimal amount.
  3. I use store-bought fine rice flour to make these Kara Ammini Kozhukattai.
  4. While steaming the ammini kozhukattai, make sure you place a stand in the pressure cooker base. This will ensure that no water enters the steaming vessel.
  5. It is important to let the steamed ammini kozhukattai cool down completely, before you proceed to do the tempering. Otherwise, there are chances that the kozhukattai will become mushy and tasteless.
  6. It is important to ensure that there are no lumps in the rice flour dough that you prepare, for the best-tasting ammini kozhukattai.
  7. Ensure that you steam the ammini kozhukattai for just 10 minutes, without the weight on. Over-steaming will make them dry out and get hard.
  8. Traditionally, when these ammini kozhukattai are prepared for the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi, they are cooked without tasting. They are first offered to Lord Ganesha, and then partaken of.

********************

Foodie Monday Blog Hop

This post is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The theme for the week is ‘Ganesh Chaturthi Recipes’.

I’m sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #240. The co-hosts this week are Deb @ The Pantry Portfolio and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

No-Cook Fruit & Nut Modak

Right about now is a beautiful time of the year to be in India. The air is so festive right now, and you cannot help but get into the spirit yourself. This is the time for a whole lot of minor and major festivals to be celebrated across various Indian communities. Janmashtami just came to an end, and Ganesh Chaturthi is around the corner. For those looking for a quick dish to make for Ganesh Chaturthi, I present to you today a super-simple recipe for Fruit & Nut Modak.

One of my most favourite festivals, Ganesh Chaturthi, is celebrated to commemorate the birth of the elephant-headed God, Ganesha. I love the fervour with which this festival is celebrated throughout India and, of course, the various foods associated with it. I love how Ganesha is such a flexible God, his idols getting more and more creative every year, sporting the avatars of everything from a software engineer to a motorcycle rider, sometimes depicting the current affairs too.

Modaks are one of the foods most commonly associated with Ganesh Chaturthi, believed to be one of Ganesha’s favourites. Traditionally, modaks are made with a rice flour shell, with a sweet jaggery-coconut stuffing inside. Over time, many different versions of the modak have come into existence, as creative and versatile as the idols of Ganesha himself.

Getting the rice flour covering and the sweet stuffing for the traditional modak right needs quite a bit of practice. For people who fear trying their hands out at them, these Fruit & Nut Modaks can be a saviour. This is a highly simple recipe, one that doesn’t need much time or effort or practice. These Fruit & Nut Modaks do not require any hard-core cooking, but they turn out wonderfully well, absolutely lovely in taste and pleasing to the eyes. They are healthy too – all the sweetness in these modaks comes from the raisins and dates added to them, with no refined sugar going in.

Intrigued?

Let’s check out the recipe for these lovely No-Cook Fruit & Nut Modak.

Ingredients (makes about 8 pieces):

  1. 15 whole cashewnuts
  2. 15-20 almonds
  3. 10 dates
  4. 1/4 cup raisins
  5. 1/4 teaspoon rose essence
  6. About 1/4 cup dry grated coconut
  7. A little milk, ghee or fresh cream, as needed, optional

Method:

  1. Remove seeds from the dates, and chop them up. Keep them ready.
  2. Heat up a pan on high flame. Lower the flame to medium, and add in the cashewnuts and almonds. Dry roast on medium flame till the cashewnuts and almonds are crisp. Take care to ensure that they do not burn. Switch off gas, and allow to cool down completely.
  3. When entirely cooled down, take the roasted cashewnuts and almonds in a small mixer jar. Pulse a couple of times, for a couple of seconds each. This will break down the cashewnuts and almonds slightly.
  4. Now, add in the chopped dates, raisins, dry grated coconut and rose essence. Pulse a couple of times for a couple of seconds. Stop in between to scrape down the sides of the mixer jar. The ingredients will all come together to form a sort of pliable mixture.
  5. If the mixture feels too dry, add in a bit of milk, fresh cream or ghee. If too sticky, you can add in a bit more dry coconut. Mix well.
  6. Shape modaks out of the mixture and place in a clean, dry, air-tight box. Let chill in the refrigerator for a couple of hours. This will help to set them. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Notes:

  1. I have used only cashewnuts, almonds, raisins and dates as the base ingredients here, along with the dry grated coconut. You may even add in other fruits and nuts of your choice. Dry figs, pistachios, pine nuts would make some great additions.
  2. After pulsing, if the mixture feels right, you can skip adding the extra dry grated coconut or milk/ghee/fresh cream at the end. In that case, just shape the mixture into modaks as is. I did not need to add anything – I was able to shape the Fruit & Nut Modaks as is.
  3. You can use a mould to shape these Fruit & Nut Modaks. I haven’t.
  4. Make sure the dates are all pitted, and no seeds remain.
  5. While dry roasting the cashewnuts and almonds, ensure that you do so on a low-medium flame. The ingredients should not burn.
  6. Traditionally, when modaks are made on the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi, they are prepared without tasting them. They are offered to Lord Ganesha first, and then partaken of.

I hope you liked this recipe! Do try out these easy Fruit & Nut Modak this Ganesh Chaturthi, and share your feedback with me!

I’m sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #240. The co-hosts this week are Deb @ The Pantry Portfolio and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

Dal Moradabadi| Moradabadi Moong Dal Chaat

This post has been a long time coming.

The Dal Moradabadi at Punjab Bistro has been on my mind ever since I tried it out, a couple of months ago. I fell in love with this dish at first bite, and have wanted to try making it at home ever since. Somehow, I never got around to doing that. When ‘Tradtional Dals of India’ was chosen as the theme for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop this week, it gave me the perfect foil to try my hands at making Dal Moradabadi, Punjab Bistro-style, at home. I was thrilled by just how beautiful in taste it turned out. It was a huge hit at home, with the family loving it to bits, and every bit of it getting polished off. It is such a simple dal, but one that is bursting with flavour, something that would make a beautiful addition to any meal.

For the uninitiated, the Dal Moradabadi is a very famous street food in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, popularly called ‘the city of brass’. The dal itself is very simple – plain split moong dal cooked soft and salted. It is the way this dal is served, with an assortment of toppings, that makes it so special. Commonly served with sweet and spicy chutneys, chopped onions and tomatoes, fresh coriander, fragrant cumin and black pepper powder, and some gorgeous black salt, the Dal Moradabadi is more of a chaat than a dal per se. It is typically had as an appetiser, on its own, even in weddings in Uttar Pradesh, but I love having it with rotis too.

There is a fascinating history behind the origin of Dal Moradabadi, too. Apparently, Prince Murad, son of Mughal ruler Shah Jahan and the founder of Moradabad, was very fond of light, simple meals that were very flavourful. One day, his cooks rustled up this Dal Moradabadi, and the prince loved it to bits. At every meal, the prince would be served this dal, with a different set of toppings – it would taste different every time, and Murad was thrilled. Head over to this Instagram post of mine for a detailed account of the history of the Dal Moradabadi.

Now, let us check out the simple recipe for this beautiful Dal Moradabadi, shall we?

Recipe adapted from: Charming Chef.

Idea Courtesy: Punjab Bistro, Bangalore

Ingredients (serves 4-6):

Basic ingredients:

  1. 1/2 cup split yellow moong dal
  2. 1/4 cup split orange masoor dal
  3. Salt to taste
  4. 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder

To serve:

  1. Roasted cumin (jeera) powder, as needed
  2. Black pepper powder, as needed
  3. Red chilli powder, as needed
  4. Black salt (kala namak), as needed
  5. Finely chopped fresh coriander leaves, as needed
  6. Ginger juliennes, as needed
  7. Lemon juice, as needed
  8. Finely chopped tomatoes, as needed
  9. Finely chopped onions, as needed
  10. Fried moong dal namkeen, as needed
  11. Spicy green chutney, as needed
  12. Sweet and sour tamarind chutney, as needed
  13. Butter, as needed

Method:

  1. Wash the split moong dal and masoor dal together under running water, a couple of times. Drain out all the excess water.
  2. Add a bit of salt and turmeric powder to the washed and drained moong dal and masoor dal. Pressure cook the moong dal and masoor dal together, with just enough water to cover them, for 4-5 whistles. Let the pressure release naturally.
  3. When the pressure has gone down completely, mash the cooked dals well. The mashed dal should lose its grainy consistency and become soft and mushy.
  4. Now, take the mashed dal in a pan. Add in salt to taste and water as needed to bring it to a soupy but not too runny consistency, roughly about 1-1/2 cups. Heat till warm.
  5. Ladle the cooked dal into serving cups. Top each cup of dal with a dash of lemon juice, tamarind chutney, green chutney, black salt, red chilli powder, roasted cumin powder, and black pepper powder. Garnish with some fried moong dal namkeen, finely chopped coriander, tomatoes and onions, and some ginger juliennes. Add a dollop of butter. That’s it – Dal Moradabadi is ready! Serve immediately.

Notes:

  1. Click here for a step-by-step recipe to make the sweet and sour tamarind chutney.
  2. Click here for the recipe for the spicy green chutney.
  3. You can use salted or unsalted butter as needed to serve the Dal Moradabadi. Desi ghee can also be used instead. This is an absolute must.
  4. I have used store-bought moong dal namkeen to serve the Dal Moradabadi.
  5. Roasted cumin powder is nothing but cumin (jeera) dry roasted till fragrant, allowed to cool down completely, and then powdered. The dry roasting adds a whole lot of fragrance to the dish.
  6. The kala namak aka black salt is an absolute must, in the serving of Dal Moradabadi.
  7. A dash of finely chopped green chillies can also be added to the Dal Moradabadi, while serving it. I have skipped them.
  8. Traditionally, only split moong daal is used to make Dal Moradabadi. I have used a mix of split moong daal and masoor daal, for the sake of better texture.
  9. Different street vendors in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, use different toppings on the Dal Moradabadi. Some serve it with papdi, some with fried green or dry red chillies, some with paneer. Some serve it with jalebi or imarti – dunk the sweet in the Dal Moradabadi and eat! The black salt, roasted cumin powder, red chilli powder, butter or desi ghee, onions, tomatoes and coriander, the sweet and sour tamarind chutney and the spicy green chutney are almost always there, though. I made and served the Dal Moradabadi the way it was at Punjab Bistro, where I absolutely loved it.
  10. In Uttar Pradesh, Dal Moradabadi is served as an appetiser or a snack, not as a main course dish. It even occupies pride of place in weddings, where it is served as a sort of palate-cleanser chaat. At Punjab Bistro, however, Dal Moradabadi is very much a main course dish, and is served with roti. I love having it both ways – on its own as well as with flatbread. Take your pick! It tastes awesome any way!
  11. You can pressure cook the dal in advance and keep it ready, well in advance. Just heat up the dal when you are ready to serve it, and add the toppings to it.

Do try this recipe out! I’m sure you will love it as much as we do! ๐Ÿ™‚

*************

Foodie Monday Blog HopThis post is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The theme for the week is ‘Traditional Dals of India’.

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #239. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com and Lathi @ From Lathiโ€™s Kitchen.

Pineapple Pulissery| Kerala-Style Pineapple In Yogurt Gravy

Kerala has been on my mind a lot lately. This beautiful land has had to face the wrath of nature in the past two weeks, with lashing rains flooding the state. There has been so much devastation – so many people losing their lives, so many losing their homes, so many losing their near and dear ones. Watching the news about the Kerala floods has been heartbreaking.

Onam this year is going to be a lacklustre affair, in Kerala and elsewhere, if it is celebrated at all that is. In fact, it even feels weird to be talking about Onam when the state of Kerala is reeling from the floods. I pray for Kerala to rise above the waters that now flood it, to get back to being the beautiful, happy, healthy place it earlier was. Today, I share with you a beautiful Kerala-special recipe, my way of sending good wishes and positive vibes Kerala’s way.

The recipe I present to you today is that for Pineapple Pulissery, a delicacy from Kerala that is often part of the Onasadya (the full-fledged plantain-leaf meal that is served on the occasion of Onam). Pieces of ripe, juicy pineapple are cooked with a fragrant, flavourful, freshly ground paste, and then mixed with curd. Sweet and salty and tangy and sour all at once, Pineapple Pulissery makes for a wonderful accompaniment to a meal.

At home, we are all ardent lovers of pineapple. So, naturally, this Pineapple pulissery is a huge hit with us. This is such a simple thing to make, and I suggest you try it out too, if you haven’t ever. I am sure you will be charmed by it too.

Here is how I make Pineapple Pulissery, the way I learnt it from my mother-in-law.

Ingredients (serves 4-5):

To grind:

  1. 1/4 cup fresh grated coconut
  2. 1 green chilly, chopped
  3. 1/2 tablespoon mustard seeds (rai)
  4. 1/2 tablespoon cumin seeds (jeera)
  5. A 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and chopped

For the tempering:

  1. 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  2. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds (rai)
  3. A pinch of fenugreek seeds (methi dana)
  4. 2 pinches of asfoetida (hing)
  5. 1 sprig curry leaves
  6. 3-4 dried red chillies

Other ingredients:

  1. 1 cup pineapple, chopped into medium-sized cubes
  2. 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  3. Salt, to taste
  4. 2 tablespoons jaggery powder, or to taste
  5. 1 cup thick curd

Method:

1. In a small mixer jar, grind together all the ingredients listed under ‘To Grind’ to a fine paste. Use a little water to grind. Keep aside.

2. Take the pineapple pieces in a pan, along with some salt and turmeric. Add in about 1-1/2 cups water. Place on high flame.

3. Cook on high flame till the pineapple pieces start getting tender. Stir intermittently.

4. Now, add the paste we prepared earlier to the pan. Add the jaggery powder. Mix well, and turn the flame to medium.

5. Cook on medium flame till the raw smell of the paste goes away, a couple of minutes. Switch off gas. Let it cool down completely.

6. When the pineapple mixture has cooled down entirely, add in the thick curd. Mix well.

7. Taste and adjust salt if needed. You can add a little red chilly powder and water in too, if needed.

8. Now, we will prepare the tempering for the Pineapple Pulissery. Heat the coconut oil in a small pan, and add in the mustard. Let it pop. Now, add the fenugreek, asafoetida, curry leaves and dry red chillies. Let them stay in for a couple of minutes, taking care to ensure that the tempering does not burn. Switch off the gas, and add this tempering to the pineapple-curd mix in the other pan. Mix well. Done! Your Pineapple Pulissery is ready to serve.

Notes:

  1. You may increase the quantity of coconut you use, if you would so like. Similarly, you may increase the quantity of mustard and cumin you use to grind into a paste. The above quantities were just perfect for us
  2. Use fresh, slightly sour curd for best results. You may increase or decrease the quantity of curd you use, depending upon personal taste preferences.
  3. Make sure all the cores and thorns are removed from the pineapple, before using them in this dish.
  4. Do not overcook the pineapple. They should be just cooked, but still retain some crunch.
  5. Pumpkin, ripe mango, raw mango are some other fruits and vegetables you can use in place of pineapple.
  6. You can even add in some garlic cloves and shallots while grinding the paste. I did not use them.
  7. For best results, use a pineapple that is fresh, nicely ripe, sweet and juicy. Do not use over-ripe pineapple. You may even use canned pineapple.
  8. Coconut oil is ideal for the tempering here.
  9. Do not heat the Pineapple Pulissery after adding in the curd, as that might cause curdling. This dish is meant to be served at room temperature.
  10. The Pineapple Pulissery can be served with rasam or sambar rice or with any other rice preparation. It can also be served as an accompaniment for a full-fledged plantain-leaf spread such as that for Onam sadya.

Did you like the recipe? Do let me know, in your comments!

*************

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #239. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com and Lathi @ From Lathiโ€™s Kitchen.

Sindhi Koki|Flavoured Flatbread With Onion

Sindhi cuisine is relatively unexplored one, at least in the Indian F&B market. Though the cuisine boasts of several beautiful recipes – Sindhi Kadhi, Daal Pakwaan or Sindhi Koki, for instance – they remain largely unknown. Most of these dishes are prepared regularly in Sindhi households, and that is about it. This post of mine is a little attempt to change that – to speak about a cuisine that deserves to be highlighted, whatever little I know about it.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Sindhi Koki, a flatbread that is quite simple to make. With just a few ingredients required, these can be made within a matter of minutes, with no prior preparation needed.

The koki might look deceptively simple from the outside – just like any ordinary flatbread – but one bite into it will surprise you. This flatbread is rich with flavours! The finely chopped onion, green chillies and coriander that go into it render it super flavourful, as do the other aromatic dry spices that are added in.

Sindhi Kokis are traditionally made crisp and chewy, with loads of ghee going into them. Thanks to this texture, they keep well for at least 2-3 days, and make for great travel companions. Personally, though, I prefer making them a little softer, so my aged parents and daughter can enjoy them too.

Here is how I make these Sindhi Koki.

Ingredients (makes about 12 pieces):

  1. 2 cups whole wheat flour
  2. Salt to taste
  3. 1 large onion, finely chopped
  4. 1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder
  5. 2 green chillies, very finely chopped
  6. 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh coriander
  7. 1/2 teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)
  8. 2 pinches asafoetida
  9. 1 tablespoon amchoor powder, or to taste
  10. 1 tablespoon coriander seed powder (dhania powder), or to taste
  11. 2 tablespoons oil + more to cook the koki

Method:

1. Take the whol wheat flour in a large mixing bowl.

2. Add in the salt to taste, coriander seed powder, asafoetida, amchoor powder, red chilli powder, carom seeds, as well as the finely chopped coriander and onion.

3. Add water little by little and bind a dough that is soft but firm.

4. When you are almost done with binding the dough, add the 2 tablespoons of oil to it. Mix well. Bind the dough to a soft but firm texture. Cover the dough and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.

5. Get a dosa pan nice and hot.

6. Meanwhile, make lemon-sized balls out of the dough. Use a rolling pin to roll one ball out into a circle. Dust with more whole wheat flour as needed.

7. Place the rolled-out dough on the hot dosa pan. Reduce the flame to low-medium, and spread a little oil around it. When the bottom of the flatbread gets brown, flip over. Cook on the other side till brown. Make sure the flatbread is well cooked on the inside, but doesn’t burn.

8. Prepare all the Sindhi koki in a similar manner. Serve hot.

Notes:

  1. Cumin seeds (jeera) can be used in place of carom seeds (ajwain).
  2. Adjust the quantity of red chilli powder, salt, amchoor powder and coriander seed powder as per personal taste preferences.
  3. Traditionally, ghee is used to cook the Sindhi Koki. I have used oil instead.
  4. Typically, the dough for the Sindhi Koki needs to be soft, yet firm. This will yield koki that are crisp and chewy, yet soft. I did not make a firm dough as I wanted soft koki that I could feed my little daughter too.
  5. If you are making this recipe for small kids, you might want to skip using the green chillies altogether.
  6. Traditionally, anardana (pomegranate seed) powder is added to Sindhi Koki for flavour. I did not have any, so I have used amchoor (dry mango) powder instead. I loved the flavour that the amchoor powder added, but you could use anardana powder instead, if you wish to make the koki as close to authentic as possible.
  7. Cook the koki on low-medium flame. Ensure that they are cooked well from the inside, and at the same time, do not burn.
  8. You can add in more oil while binding the dough, if you so desire. Typically, a whole lot of oil is added to the dough, which gives it a softness in spite of its firm texture. I restricted myself to 2 tablespoons.
  9. Serve the Sindhi Koki piping hot. This flatbread goes with any kind of gravy-based sabzi or daal, pickle, curd or raita. I served these with a very South Indian tomato thokku, and we absolutely loved the combination.
  10. If you find it tough to roll out the kokis, you may use a sheet of plastic, butter paper, or parchment paper on top of your rolling surface.

*****************

Foodie Monday Blog HopThis recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The very interesting theme for this week is ‘Indian Flatbreads’.

I’m also sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #237. The co-hosts this week are Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Diann @ Of Goats and Greens.

Kashmiri Wazwan @ Radisson Blu, Marathahalli

I consider myself incredibly lucky for having had the chance to visit Kashmir, the land touted as ‘Paradise on Earth’, not once but twice so far. I am glad I have had a chance to explore a little of the cuisine of this beautiful place, to delve deeper into the food that nourishes the people of this land. Kashmiri cuisine has always surprised me with its out-of-the-box (at least for me) preparations, the use of spices to make food magical, and its simplicity. So, when I was recently invited to partake of a Kashmiri feast at Saffron, Radisson Blu in Marathahalli, I absolutely had to go. I ended up having an absolutely lovely time here, with some great food being served.

This is one food festival you must head to!

Kashmiri Wazwan food festival at Saffron

Saffron, the restaurant at Radisson Blu, Marathahalli, is celebrating a Kashmiri food festival till August 20, 2018. Kashmiri chef Irshad Ahmad Wani and his team are all set to serve to the citizens of Bangalore a feast full of the flavours of his hometown.

The special menu curated for the food festival, called Kashmiri Wazwan, is available only for dinner at Saffron, on an a la carte basis. There are loads of options for vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike, which is something I loved. I also loved that the menu encompasses more than Kashmiri pulao, kahwah and dum aloo, which is what Kashmiri food means to a lot of people.

If you are in ‘uru and have always wanted to try out food from the valley, this is your chance to do so! The food for the festival is being cooked by an actual Kashmiri chef and his team, and is hence as authentic as can be. How cool is that, right?

The ambience at Saffron

Saffron exudes an old-world charm, with its dark wood furniture, high ceilings, and large windows. The decor is simple and understated, yet elegant. There are little, classy pops of art here and there, which add to the charm of the place.

Glimpses of Saffron, the restaurant at Radisson Blu, Marathahalli

The restaurant feels airy and bright, in spite of having a generous number of seats. This is not a dimly-lit place, but one filled with natural sunlight, and I absolutely loved that.

The open kitchen at the back lets you have a view of all the behind-the-scenes action, building up your appetite in the process.

The service was impeccable, the staff attentive yet not hovering. They were brimming with Radisson Blu’s characteristic courtesy, warmth and friendliness.

Food and drinks

Now, let’s take a look at the food and drinks we sampled at Saffron!

We started our meal with Sabzi Badami Shorba, a light vegetable soup with slivers of almond in it. It was subtly spiced, the perfect foil for all the beautiful dishes that were about to be served to us in the course of the meal.

Top: Subzi Badami Shorba; Bottom left and right: Papads and fries with assorted dips

Along with the soup, we were presented a basket of papads and fries, with an assortment of Kashmiri dips. The dips – spicy onion, walnut and curd, radish, and green chilly and mint – were so very lovely. We loved munching on these, especially so because they brought back fond memories of hearty meals we have had while holidaying in Kashmir.

img_20180813_225658891121950.jpg
The starters we tried at the Kashmiri Wazwan food festival. Top Left: Paneer Tikka (Picture Courtesy: Avril’s Food Journee); Bottom Left: Makai Malai Tikki; Bottom Right: Nadru Ki Shaami; Top Right: Zaam Doodh Kebab

Then came the starters. The Paneer Tikka (cottage cheese marinated in spices and grilled) and Makai Malai Tikki (corn and cream cutlets) were presented first, both of which were decent. The paneer was supremely soft and the corn tikkis melt-in-your-mouth, but, again, I felt they could have done with a bit more flavour.

The next starter, Nadru Ki Shaami, cutlets made with lotus stem, didn’t really titillate my tastebuds. They were really well done, but I would have loved some more flavour to them.

The Zaam Doodh Kebab or hung curd patties that were brought to the table next were beautiful – the star of the starters for me. They were just the right amount of sour, perfectly made, and the walnut stuffing within took the taste up several notches.

And then, it was time to move on to the main course.

img_20180813_2303411273739002.jpg
The main course dishes we sampled at Kashmiri Wazwan. Top: Assorted vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes; Bottom Left: Assorted flatbreads with Modur Pulav and a non-vegetarian gravy; Bottom Centre: My main course platter; Bottom Right: Al Yakhni, which stole the show for me

With some wonderful, pillow soft flatbreads, I sampled four vegetarian Kashmiri curries.

The Kashmiri Dum Aloo, baby potatoes cooked Kashmir-style with a yogurt- and tomato-based gravy, was just beautiful.

The Tamatar Chaman, deep-fried cottage cheese cooked in a tomato-fennel gravy, though, was quite average.

The Schuk Wangun, baby eggplants cooked the Kashmiri way with a tomato-and-tamarind base, literally had me licking my fingers. Yes, it was that delish!

It was the Al Yakhni, a yogurt-based preparation with bottlegourd, that stole the show for me. It was so mild, so simple, yet so delicious! Who would have thought bottlegourd could be this fantastic?!

The Modur Pulav that came next – a sweet Kashmiri preparation with basmati rice, dry fruits, nuts and herbs – was brilliant too. It was so fragrant, so subtle, yet an absolute delight to eat.

Left: The First Kiss, a mocktail at Saffron; Top Right: Black Magic, another mocktail; Bottom Right: Kashmiri Kahwah

Along with our meal, we sipped on a couple of mocktails from Saffron’s extensive drink menu. I tried out The First Kiss, a medley of orange, apple and lemon, was very well made and refreshing. I also sampled Black Magic, a mocktail with cola, lemon, ginger and mint that I loved to bits. Please note that the mocktails are not part of the Kashmiri Wazwan menu, but they can be served to you from the regular bar menu if you so desire, at an additional cost.

We washed the food down with some Kashmiri Kahwah, a warm and mildly sweet concoction that was very well brewed.

Phirni and Kesar Ras Malai at Saffron

Our meal ended with the two desserts that are on offer as part of the Kashmiri Wazwan menu – Phirni and Kesar Ras Malai.

I have never been a big fan of the grainy texture of phirni or its taste so, as always, it didn’t excite me too much. The Kesar Ras Malai? Now, that was a different story altogether. It was so very well done, with just the right amount of sweet and thickness. Served cold, with a hint of saffron to it, it was heavenly!

In hindsight…

All of us had a thoroughly enjoyable meal at the Kashmiri Wazwan food festival. I loved most of the food that was served to us, and Saffron’s wonderful hospitality ensured that we had a great experience overall.

Like I was saying earlier, the food took us back to our holidays in Kashmir, making us remember some lovely meals we have had there. The food is, indeed, true-blue Kashmiri, or at least to the extent that that is possible in Bangalore.

Don’t miss this! Head to Saffron at Radisson Blu, Marathahalli, on or before August 20 for your fix of Kashmiri flavours.

************

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #237. The co-hosts this week are Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Diann @ Of Goats and Greens.

Nei Payasam| Kerala Rice Kheer

This year, the festival of Onam falls on August 27. I am eagerly waiting for the day to arrive, so I can lay my hands on a typical Onam sadya (a traditional plantain-leaf feast served on the occasion of Onam). ๐Ÿ˜‰ Till then, I plan to herald the festival on my blog through a series of Onam-special recipes, courtesy of my mother-in-law who hails from Palakkad.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Nei Payasam, a Kerala-style kheer made with matta rice. This payasam is typically served in the course of an Onam sadya. It is also commonly prepared during weddings and other festive occasions, and as an offering to God in the temples of Kerala.

Nei payasam‘ literally translates into ‘kheer with ghee‘, and, true to its name, this kheer is redolent of the goodness of ghee. All of us at home are big fans of this nei payasam, with its coconut-ghee flavour, and slurp it up by the bowlfuls. Yes, the bub included! ๐Ÿ™‚

This kheer is traditionally made with jaggery, and is really sweet and rich and heavenly, especially to those with a huge sweet tooth like us. In fact, this dish is often referred to as ‘Kadu Madhura Payasam‘ or ‘kheer that is very sweet’ in Kerala households. I have slightly reduced the quantity of jaggery, ghee and coconut than what is usually used, but the payasam still tasted absolutely beautiful.

Now, without further ado, let’s get to the recipe for this Kerala nei payasam aka kadu madhura payasam, shall we?

Ingredients (serves 4-5):

  1. 1/2 cup broken matta rice
  2. 1 cup jaggery
  3. 1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
  4. 2 pinches of dry ginger powder (optional)
  5. 2 pinches of cardamom (elaichi) powder
  6. 4 tablespoons ghee (divided)
  7. 8-10 cashewnuts
  8. 1 tablespoon raisins

Method:

1. Wash the broken matta rice thoroughly under running water, a couple of times. Drain out all the excess water.

2. Pressure cook the washed and drained rice with 1 cup water for 4 whistles. Let the pressure release naturally.

3. In a heavy-bottomed pan, heat the jaggery together with 2 cups of water. Keep on high flame till the jaggery melts completely. Let the jaggery syrup come to a boil.

4. Now, turn the flame to medium. Add the cooked broken matta rice to the melted jaggery in the pan, along with the fresh grated coconut.

5. Cook on medium flame, stirring intermittently, till the mixture begins to thicken.

6. When the mixture starts thickening add in 2 tablespoons of ghee. Cook for a minute or so more, or till the mixture is thick, yet slightly runny.

7. Add in the dry ginger powder and cardamom powder. Mix well. Cook for a few seconds, then switch off the flame.

8. In another pan, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of ghee. Add in the cashewnuts (broken) and the raisins. Once the raisins plump up, switch off the gas. Ensure the cashewnuts and raisins do not burn.

9. Add the plumped raisins and cashewnuts to the rice-jaggery mixture in the other pan. Mix well.

10. Serve the nei payasam hot, at room temperature or chilled.

Notes:

1. I have used broken matta rice here, which is also called Palakkadan rosematta rice or Kerala red rice. You can use any variety of Kerala rice to make this nei payasam.

2. You can even add slivered almonds to the nei payasam. I haven’t.

3. I have used yellowish-coloured jaggery to make this payasam, which has contributed to its light colour. Traditionally, in Kerala homes, reddish jaggery is used, which gives the payasam a deep reddish-brown hue.

4. Some people add in slices of banana to the payasam, after it is cooked. I have skipped that.

5. The quantities of rice, jaggery, water and ghee above were just perfect for us. You may increase or decrease the quantities of these ingredients, as per personal taste preferences.

6. Make sure the cashewnuts and raisins do not get burnt.

7. For best results, use good-quality grainy ghee and jaggery. Also, ensure that you use freshly grated coconut.

8. You can add in a few slivers of coconut while frying the raisins and cashewnuts. I haven’t.

9. Do not overcook the payasam, as that will lead to the rice getting overly hard. Also, add in the rice when the jaggery has fully melted and the syrup is beginning to boil.

10. Remember that the rice needs to be pressure cooked well, but should not be overlooked. A slightly grainy texture works best for this nei payasam.

11. Switch off the gas when the payasam has thickened considerably, but is still quite runny. It thickens quite a bit more on cooling.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

****************

Foodie Monday Blog HopThis post is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The theme this week is ‘Onam Recipes’.

I’m also sharing this with Fiesta Friday #236, whose co-hosts this week are Julianna @ Foodie on Board and Debanita @ Canvassed Recipes.

Kavuni Arisi Adai| Indian Black Rice Pancakes

Have you ever cooked with black rice? It is an ingredient very new to my kitchen, for I started cooking with black rice fairly recently. These Indian Black Rice Pancakes are something I used it in a while back, and they were so much loved by everyone at home!

Some quick facts about Black Rice

  1. Black rice has a deep black colour, which comes from the anthocyanins present in them. Anthocyanins are a family of antioxidants that are present in foods with a similar colour, such as blackberries and blueberries.
  2. The anthocyanins in black rice help in preventing cancer and heart disease, regulate blood sugar, and reduce the absorption of cholesterol. This rice is higher in fibre and protein than ordinary white rice, too. It has a high level of iron and Vitamin E. It has a lower number of calories than brown rice.
  3. Black rice has a mild, nutty taste that lends itself well to both sweet and savoury dishes. The rice turns purplish in hue when cooked.
  4. Black rice is majorly grown in tropical areas like North-East region in India, as well as in China, Indonesia, Thailand and Myanmar. There might be variations in the types of black rice grown at each of these places.
  5. Considering that black rice is so high in nutrition, it was once reserved only for royalty in China. Only rulers and their families would be allowed to eat it, due to which it was given the name ‘Forbidden Rice’. Though the rice is still referred to as Forbidden Rice at times, it is now widely available in supermarkets and health stores across India.
  6. In spite of its high nutritional content, black rice still remains a largely unexplored ingredient in India. The Chettinad region of Tamil Nadu, though, has been using this rice since ages. The Chettiars or the locals of this region, mostly traders, would often travel for business to Indonesia and Burma (now Myanmar), and would bring back packets of black rice with them. The Chettiars call this rice Burma Rice or ‘Kavuni Arisi‘, and largely use it in a sweet preparation called ‘Kavuni Arisi Halwa‘.
  7. Black rice is also referred to as Purple Rice or Magic Rice.
  8. It is different from Wild Rice.
  9. For best results, black rice should be soaked overnight before cooking. It is best cooked in a pan, covered, with twice the amount of water. Care should be taken to ensure that it is cooked just enough, as overcooking will make it quite sticky and mushy.
  10. In North-East India, black rice is commonly used to make a sweet dish called Chak-hao.

Recipe for Indian Black Rice Pancakes

In Bangalore, black rice has been making an appearance lately on the menus of new-age cafes, mostly in the forms of salad and pudding. I decided to use it in a savoury preparation, a very South Indian one at that – Indian-style pancakes or adai.

The Kavuni Arisi Adai tasted lovely, and the addition of onions took the taste higher by several notches. Thanks to the urad daal in it, it turned out super soft too. Actually, I added in a variety of lentils to the batter – even some of the black moth daal that I picked up in Kashmir. Super nutritious, with all those whole grains in!

 

Here’s how I made the Indian Black Rice pancakes or Kavuni Arisi Adai.

Ingredients (yields 28-30 pancakes):

For the batter:

  1. 1 cup black rice or kavuni arisi
  2. 1/2 teaspoon fenugreek (methi) seeds
  3. 1/2 cup raw rice
  4. 1/2 cup Kashmiri black moth daal
  5. 1/2 cup chana daal
  6. 1/2 cup split black urad daal
  7. 1/2 cup toor daal
  8. Salt, to taste
  9. 7-8 dry red chillies
  10. 6-7 cloves of garlic, peeled
  11. A 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and chopped finely
  12. 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves

To make the pancakes:

  1. Oil, as needed
  2. Finely chopped onion, as needed (optional)
  3. Finely chopped coriander, as needed (optional)

Method:

  1. Place the black rice, chana daal, fenugreek seeds, urad daal, raw rice, toor daal and Kashmiri moth daal together in a large vessel. Wash these ingredients well under running water a couple of times. Then, drain out all the water.
  2. Add in enough fresh water to cover all of these ingredients. Cover the vessel with a lid. Let the ingredients soak for 8-10 hours or overnight.
  3. When the soaking time is over, drain out the excess water from these ingredients. Grind half of the ingredients to a coarse batter, in a mixer jar. Transfer the ground batter to a large vessel.
  4. Now, take the rest of the soaked ingredients in the mixer jar. Add in dry red chillies, peeled garlic cloves, and peeled and chopped ginger. Grind coarsely. Add this batter to the one we ground earlier.
  5. Add salt to taste to the batter, as well as curry leaves. Mix well. The batter is now ready to use to make pancakes or adai.
  6. When you are ready to make the adai, add finely chopped onion and coriander to the batter (optional), as needed. You may even add in finely chopped green chillies, as needed. To make the adai, heat a dosa pan well on high flame. Now, reduce the flame to medium. Place a ladleful of the batter in the centre of the pan, and spread it out. Add some oil all around the adai. When cooked on the bottom, flip it over. Cook on the other side too, on medium flame. Serve immediately.

Notes:

1. I used Sona Masoori raw rice in the batter. You can use any type of raw rice that you prefer.

2. I used Manipuri black rice from Happy Healthy Me, to make these adai.

3. If you do not have Kashmiri black moth daal, you can entirely skip adding that to the batter.

4. This batter does not need any fermenting, and can be used immediately after grinding. However, if you want a slight sourness to the adai, you may set aside the batter, covered, at room temperature for fermenting for a few hours.

5. If you do not plan on using the batter immediately, you can store it in the refrigerator. It keeps well for 2-3 days.

6. Add the onion, coriander and green chillies (if using) just before you begin preparing the adai. It is totally optional to add these, but I would highly recommend that you do.

7. I had a bit of batter left over after making these adai, with onion and coriander added, and used it to make kuzhi paniyaram. Those also turned out absolutely lovely, soft and delicious!

fb_img_1533558583005-012110993449.jpeg

8. These Kavuni Arisi Adai do not really need an accompaniment. However, they go well with powdered jaggery or a simple South Indian coconut chutney.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

Also, would you like to see more black rice recipes on my blog?

******

I’m sending this recipe to Fiesta Friday #236. The co-hosts this week are Julianna @ Foodie on Board and Debanita @ Canvassed Recipes.