Karnataka Bonda Soup Recipe

Growing up in Ahmedabad, I never knew something called Bonda Soup existed. It was the husband who introduced me to it, a while after we were wedded. We were breakfasting in a ‘Darshini‘ – the name which is commonly used to refer to little, quick-serve eateries all over Karnataka – near our place in Bangalore. I ordered my favourite masala dosa, while the husband opted for the Bonda Soup. He explained to the curious me what Bonda Soup was – deep-fried bondas made of urad daal, soaked in a slightly spicy, slightly tangy daal soup. He explained how it was a much loved snack all over Karnataka, and urged me to take a spoonful.

To be honest, the Karnataka Bonda Soup did not sound appealing at all, the first time I heard of it. It did not sound appetising at all, not something I thought I would like. One bite into it, though, and I was hooked. I fell in love with the neither thin-nor thick broth, the fragrance of the ginger, green chillies and coriander in it, the way it turned slightly tangy with the tomatoes, the way the crisp shell of the bondas soaked the broth in. Years later, I’m still in love with this beauty. Have it at the right places, and I’m sure you will fall in love with them too!

Because the husband loves Bonda Soup so very much and because I grew to love it too, I learnt to make it at home, over the years. It makes for a gorgeous snack for lazy weekends and can even double up as a weekday dinner. It is absolute comfort food on gloomy winter days and dark rainy days alike.

For this month, cuisine from the state of Karnataka was chosen as the theme for the Shhhhh Cooking Secretly Challenge group that I am part of. My partner for the month, Sujata Shukla, the talented blogger behind Pepper On Pizza, assigned me two secret ingredients – urad daal and ginger. I instantly knew I wanted to make Bonda Soup, and that is just what I went ahead and did.

Today, I present to you my Karnataka Bonda Soup recipe.

Ingredients (serves 4-5):

For the bonda:

  1. 1/2 cup whole or split urad daal
  2. Salt to taste
  3. 2 green chillies
  4. 1 sprig fresh curry leaves
  5. A few slivers of fresh coconut
  6. Oil, as needed to deep-fry

For the soup:

  1. 1/2 cup split yellow moong daal
  2. 1/2 cup split orange masoor daal
  3. Salt to taste
  4. A 1-inch piece of ginger
  5. 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  6. 2 big tomatoes
  7. 3-4 green chillies
  8. 1 sprig fresh curry leaves
  9. 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh coriander leaves
  10. Lemon juice to taste
  11. 1 tablespoon ghee
  12. 1 teaspoon mustard
  13. 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  14. 2 pinches of asafoetida

Method:

Let us begin by making the batter for the bonda.

1. Soak the urad daal in just enough water to cover it, for 3-4 hours.

2.Once soaked, drain out all the water from the urad daal.

3. Grind the soaked and drained urad daal to a fine batter, along with chopped green chillies and salt to taste. Add a little water while grinding, if required.

4. Roughly tear the curry leaves with your hands, and add them to the ground batter. Add in the coconut slivers too. Mix well. The bonda batter is ready.

Now, we will prepare to fry the bondas and make the soup.

1. Wash the moong daal and masoor daal together under running water a couple of times. Drain out the excess water.

2. Add in the tomatoes (chopped), green chillies (slit) and ginger (peeled and chopped finely). Add in enough water to cover the ingredients. Pressure cook all these ingredients together for 5 whistles or till the daals are soft. Let the pressure come down naturally.

3. Heat oil for deep frying bondas in a pan, till it reaches smoking point.

Meanwhile, we will make the soup.

1. Heat the ghee in a pan. Add the mustard, and let it pop.

2. Add the cumin seeds and asafoetida, and let them stay in for a couple of seconds.

3. Reduce the flame to medium. Gently mash the moong daal, masoor daal and other ingredients we pressure cooked, and add these to the pan. Add in salt to taste, turmeric powder and about 2 cups of water. Adjust the amount of water depending upon how thick you want the soup to be. It should, ideally be runny but not too watery. Mix well.

4. Let the soup simmer on low-medium flame for about 2 minutes. Switch off the flame.

5. Mix in finely chopped coriander leaves and lemon juice to taste. The soup is now ready.

Now, we will fry the bondas.

1. When the oil reaches smoking point, reduce the flame to low-medium. Drop medium-sized balls of the batter into the hot oil. Deep fry these bondas evenly.

2. Deep fry bondas using all the batter, the same way. Keep aside.

How to serve the bonda soup

1. If needed, heat the soup mildly.

2. Add a few ladles of the soup in a serving bowl.

3. Add 2-3 bondas to the serving bowl. Serve immediately.

Notes:

1. I commonly use whole white urad daal to make the bonda.

2. You can add in some finely chopped green chillies and black peppercorns to the bonda too. I skip these, usually.

3. If the soup feels a tad bland, you can add in a bit of coriander powder and/or red chilli powder.

Did you like the Karnataka Bonda Soup recipe? I hope you will try it out too, and that you will love it as much as we do!

*****************

shhh-secretly-challenge-image

This Karnataka Bonda Soup recipe is for the Shhhhh Cooking Secretly Challenge.

I suggested that my partner for the challenge, Sujata Shukla, use the two secret ingredients of bamboo shoots and coconut. Being the brilliant cook that she is, she whipped up an excellent Coorgi Baimbale Kari. Do head over to her blog to check the recipe out!

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #239. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com and Lathi @ From Lathi’s Kitchen.

 

Advertisements

Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka| Pan-Grilled Mushrooms & Cottage Cheese

The husband and I are big fans of tandoori dishes. Give us a well-made plate of tandoori tikka any day, and we would be two grinning Cheshire cats. On rainy days like today, straight-off-the-pan tandoori tikka couldn’t be more perfect. Today, I present to you the recipe for Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka, one of our all-time favourites.

Tandoori dishes make for the perfect party appetiser, delicious and simple to prepare as they are. The secret to a great-tasting tandoori tikka lies in its curd-and-assorted-spices marinade. Once you have got that sorted, it is just a matter of minutes to put together a dish. What’s more, they need very little oil – barely about 1 tablespoon in all – to make.

Typically, as the name suggests, tandoori dishes are prepared in a tandoor oven, where it is grilled at high temperatures to get that perfect marriage of flavours. In the absence of a tandoor, however, you can use an OTG or microwave oven, a charcoal grill, a grill pan or even your good ol’ dosa pan! The latter is what I have used to make this dish, and I can’t even begin to describe how beautiful in taste it turned out.

Let’s check out the recipe for my Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka aka Pan-Grilled Mushrooms & Cottage Cheese.

Ingredients (serves 3-4):

For the marinade:

  1. 1/2 cup thick curd
  2. Salt, to taste
  3. 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  4. Red chilli powder, to taste
  5. 1 teaspoon besan aka gram flour
  6. 1 teaspoon garam masala
  7. 1 teaspoon chaat masala
  8. 1/2 teaspoon amchoor powder
  9. 1 teaspoon kasoori methi
  10. A 1/2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  11. 1 teaspoon oil

Other ingredients:

  1. 150 grams button mushrooms
  2. 200 grams paneer aka cottage cheese
  3. Oil, as needed, to drizzle
  4. Chaat masala, as needed, to serve

Method:

  1. In a large mixing bowl, mix together all the ingredients for the marinade. Keep aside.
  2. Cut the paneer into large slices or cubes, as you prefer. Keep aside.
  3. Wash the mushrooms thoroughly under running water, until they are free of dirt. Chop off the stems from the mushrooms. Keep aside.
  4. Drop all the paneer cubes/slices, the mushroom caps and stems into the curd marinade. Mix gently, but well, ensuring that all of the paneer and mushroom caps and stems are properly coated with the marinade.
  5. Cover the mixing bowl with a lid. Place it in the refrigerator (not freezer) for about 2 hours, for the mushrooms and the paneer to absorb all the flavours from the marinade.
  6. Once the 2 hours are up, heat a thick dosa pan on high flame. Then, turn down the flame to low-medium and drizzle some oil over it. Evenly spread out some marinated pieces of mushroom and paneer evenly over the pan. When they get brown on the bottom, acquiring a little charring, flip over using a pair of tongs. Let the mushroom and paneer pieces cook well on the other side too, getting a bit charred. When done, transfer to a serving plate.
  7. Cook all of the mushroom and paneer pieces the same way. Drizzle a little more oil on the pan in between two batches.
  8. Serve the Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka hot, drizzled with chaat masala, with some spicy green chutney on the side.

Notes:

  1. Home-made paneer can get quite crumbly and soggy, so it is best to use store-bought, firm paneer for this recipe.
  2. For the marinade, use thick, fresh curd that isn’t too sour, for best results.
  3. Letting the marinated mushrooms and paneer rest for 2 hours in the refrigerator is good enough. However, if you want to, you can leave it to rest for longer, even overnight.
  4. If the curd you are using is sour, you may want to skip using the amchoor powder.
  5. Be careful while adding salt to the marinade. The chaat masala will also have quite a bit of saltiness to it too.
  6. This Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka can also be made in an OTG, a microwave oven, a charcoal grill or on the stove-top, using a grill pan. I used an ordinary dosa pan instead.
  7. Here’s a step-by-step recipe for making a spicy green chutney that you can serve with this Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka.
  8. Make sure the Tandoori Mushroom & Paneer Tikka doesn’t get burnt while cooking, but a little charring around the edges adds a lovely flavour to it.
  9. You can grill veggies like tomato, capsicum, baby corn, pieces of sweet corn, carrot and boiled potatoes the same way.
  10. Some people use only the caps of the mushrooms and discard the stems. I use both.

***********

Foodie Monday Blog HopThis recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The theme for this week is ‘Grilled Recipes’.

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #239. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com and Lathi @ From Lathi’s Kitchen.

Old Favourites From Made In Punjab Now Back At BBQ’D!

Made In Punjab Revival At BBQ’D

Old-time foodies from Bangalore will remember Made In Punjab in UB City. It used to be quite an institution back in the days, known for its authentic Punjabi food and unconventional twists to traditional dishes. About a year ago, Made In Punjab got rebranded as BBQ’D, and everything from the look of the restaurant to the menu changed. However, it so happened that Made In Punjab refused to get out of people’s minds. Patrons kept asking for their favourite foods at Made In Punjab over and over again, so much so that the management recently decided to add them back in the BBQ’D menu! 🙂

fb_img_1534913800966-01402915156.jpeg
The ambience at BBQ’D

Along with a bunch of other foodies from the city, I had the opportunity to check out this ‘Made In Punjab Revival Menu’ at BBQ’D, just a few days ago. I absolutely loved most of the fare we were served, amidst sips of some of BBQ’D signature mocktails. Chef Mahabir Pundir, Head Chef at BBQ’D, has been spearheading this ‘Made In Punjab Revival’, and I must say he has done a brilliant job of it.

fb_img_1534913824997-011736729901.jpeg
Chef Mahabir Pundir, who served us with remarkable hospitality and warmth

What did we try out?

Mocktails and other drinks

Watermelon Shikanjeevi: The ordinary watermelon juice has been taken to a whole new level with this shikanjeevi! With the addition of chaat masala and some other fragrant spices, this was one bomb of a drink, and I loved it to bits. I appreciate the fact that real watermelon juice has been used here, rather than something out of a bottle.

Kesar Pisteywali Lassi: The Kesar Pisteywali Lassi is a drink that has been re-introduced to the menu, from the Made In Punjab days, on popular demand. One sip of it, and you know exactly why it was so much in demand – it is sinfully rich and creamy, served with a generous dose of dried fruits and nuts, so very delicious, absolute bliss to gulp down. This was definitely one of the stars of the show at our table! Highly recommended!

Khattha Meetha: I loved this mocktail too, simple as it was. Perfectly made with orange juice, it was the right mix of sweet and sour, utterly refreshing.

Top (left to right): Watermelon Shikanjeevi (Modelled by Sakhi Ravoor); Kesar Pisteywali Lassi, and Khattha Meetha; Bottom (left to right): Litchi Touch; Guava Mary; and Minty Apple

Litchi Touch: This mocktail sure is a stunner – a beautiful shade of green, served in a tall glass. It tasted decent, but was a tad too sweet and syrupy for me.

Guava Mary: I loved this one! Guava juice served up cocktail-style, but without alcohol, with salt around the rim. It was so very delicious and refreshing.

Minty Apple: A mix of apple juice and fresh mint, this mocktail surely sounded interesting. It was a tad too sweet and syrupy for my liking, though.

Appetisers

Palak Patta Chaat: This dish was such a looker, with crispy-fried spinach leaves standing tall in a platter, served with sweet and sour curd. The spinach had been fried a tad too crisp, but overall, this chaat was oh-so-delectable!

Bhatti Paneer: Cottage cheese aka paneer is subtly spiced, then rolled in crumbs of papad, deep-fried and served with a drizzle of ghee. That is Bhatti Paneer for you. It was so, so delicious, it had us licking our fingers!

Tandoori Bharwan Aloo: Potatoes are scooped out, then fried, and stuffed with a potato-and-paneer filling, to create this appetiser. It was very well done, and tasted as lovely as it looked!

Top (left to right): Palak Patta Chaat; Bhatti Paneer; Tandoori Bharwan Aloo; Bottom (left to right): Hara Bhara Kabab; Legacy Tandoori Champ Paneer; Malai Broccoli

Hara Bhara Kabab: I don’t like the Hara Bhara Kabab at a lot of places – it is often too bland for my tastebuds. At BBQ’D, it was a wholly different story altogether. The Hara Bhara Kabab here was beautifully done, full of flavour. The taste was spot on!

Legacy Tandoori Champ Paneer: This was another beauty of an appetiser! Soft, soft, soft chunks of paneer were marinated and grilled to perfection, served with some really flavourful chutneys made in-house. Finger-lickingly delicious, I tell you!

Malai Broccoli: Here, broccoli is cooked in a rich, creamy sauce that is simply and mildly spiced. This was quite nice, but sort of paled in comparison to the other, very lovely Punjabi appetisers.

Tandoori Mushroom Tikka: This was the star of the starters, at least for me. Marinated Portobello mushrooms were stuffed with a delicious cheese stuffing, grilled to perfection and served with some secret sauces made in-house. So, so, so good! I highly recommend this to you!

fb_img_1534913759677-011431057116.jpeg
The very lovely Tandoori Mushroom Tikka

Main course

The main course spread was just as lavish as the two earlier courses. We were presented with a host of dishes that are Made In Punjab signatures, brought back into the BBQ’D menu.

With assorted flatbreads, we had the following.

Lehsooni Chhena: This was a mildly spicy, simple gravy with garlic-infused spinach and in-house chhena. While it was decent in taste, I found it to be quite bland. A bit more flavour to it, and this dish could have worked wonders.

Lahori Aloo: This dish consisted of potatoes cooked Lahore-style in an extremely flavourful, tangy gravy, redolent of spices like kalonji. What’s to not love? I loved this curry to bits! So perfectly made this one was!

Daal Makhani: The Daal Makhani was the requisite amount of thick and creamy, but I felt it could have done with some more flavour. The texture was lovely, but taste-wise, it somewhere fell short of brilliant, in my opinion.

Top Left: The lavish main course that we indulged in; Top Right: Vegetable Pulav; Bottom (left to right): Lahoori Aloo, Daal Makhani, Lehsooni Palak Chhena

Vegetable Pulav: The Vegetable Pulav was well-made, a simple dish with lots of veggies and chunks of paneer. The fried onions it was topped with added a lovely texture to the dish. However, I found it a tad bland in taste, again – some more flavour to it, and this dish would have been par excellence.

Desserts

And then, it was time to try out the desserts! We sampled two favourite desserts from Made In Punjab, which have been re-introduced to the BBQ’D menu.

Nukkad Jalebi: If you are anything like me, you adore piping-hot jalebis that are straight off the pan. Now, what if these straight-off-the-pan jalebis are presented beautifully to you, in a wine goblet, with some ultra-delish, rich rabdi? That’s exactly what the Nukkad Jalebi at BBQ’D is all about. It was instant love for me with this dessert, something I couldn’t stop gorging on.

Left: Nukkad Jalebi; Right: Rasmalai

Rasmalai: Rasmalai was the other lovely dish served to us at BBQ’D. The chhena balls were just perfect, gloriously soft and spongy. The ras or the syrup the balls were served in could have been thicker and a bit more creamy.

In hindsight

I enjoyed most of the dishes I tried out, from the Made In Punjab Revival Menu at BBQ’D. I loved the plating of the starters as well!

I am so glad Made In Punjab is back, albeit in a little way. I would urge you to visit BBQ’D too, and have your fill of these dishes. I’m sure you won’t regret it!

Pineapple Pulissery| Kerala-Style Pineapple In Yogurt Gravy

Kerala has been on my mind a lot lately. This beautiful land has had to face the wrath of nature in the past two weeks, with lashing rains flooding the state. There has been so much devastation – so many people losing their lives, so many losing their homes, so many losing their near and dear ones. Watching the news about the Kerala floods has been heartbreaking.

Onam this year is going to be a lacklustre affair, in Kerala and elsewhere, if it is celebrated at all that is. In fact, it even feels weird to be talking about Onam when the state of Kerala is reeling from the floods. I pray for Kerala to rise above the waters that now flood it, to get back to being the beautiful, happy, healthy place it earlier was. Today, I share with you a beautiful Kerala-special recipe, my way of sending good wishes and positive vibes Kerala’s way.

The recipe I present to you today is that for Pineapple Pulissery, a delicacy from Kerala that is often part of the Onasadya (the full-fledged plantain-leaf meal that is served on the occasion of Onam). Pieces of ripe, juicy pineapple are cooked with a fragrant, flavourful, freshly ground paste, and then mixed with curd. Sweet and salty and tangy and sour all at once, Pineapple Pulissery makes for a wonderful accompaniment to a meal.

At home, we are all ardent lovers of pineapple. So, naturally, this Pineapple pulissery is a huge hit with us. This is such a simple thing to make, and I suggest you try it out too, if you haven’t ever. I am sure you will be charmed by it too.

Here is how I make Pineapple Pulissery, the way I learnt it from my mother-in-law.

Ingredients (serves 4-5):

To grind:

  1. 1/4 cup fresh grated coconut
  2. 1 green chilly, chopped
  3. 1/2 tablespoon mustard seeds (rai)
  4. 1/2 tablespoon cumin seeds (jeera)
  5. A 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and chopped

For the tempering:

  1. 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  2. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds (rai)
  3. A pinch of fenugreek seeds (methi dana)
  4. 2 pinches of asfoetida (hing)
  5. 1 sprig curry leaves
  6. 3-4 dried red chillies

Other ingredients:

  1. 1 cup pineapple, chopped into medium-sized cubes
  2. 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  3. Salt, to taste
  4. 2 tablespoons jaggery powder, or to taste
  5. 1 cup thick curd

Method:

1. In a small mixer jar, grind together all the ingredients listed under ‘To Grind’ to a fine paste. Use a little water to grind. Keep aside.

2. Take the pineapple pieces in a pan, along with some salt and turmeric. Add in about 1-1/2 cups water. Place on high flame.

3. Cook on high flame till the pineapple pieces start getting tender. Stir intermittently.

4. Now, add the paste we prepared earlier to the pan. Add the jaggery powder. Mix well, and turn the flame to medium.

5. Cook on medium flame till the raw smell of the paste goes away, a couple of minutes. Switch off gas. Let it cool down completely.

6. When the pineapple mixture has cooled down entirely, add in the thick curd. Mix well.

7. Taste and adjust salt if needed. You can add a little red chilly powder and water in too, if needed.

8. Now, we will prepare the tempering for the Pineapple Pulissery. Heat the coconut oil in a small pan, and add in the mustard. Let it pop. Now, add the fenugreek, asafoetida, curry leaves and dry red chillies. Let them stay in for a couple of minutes, taking care to ensure that the tempering does not burn. Switch off the gas, and add this tempering to the pineapple-curd mix in the other pan. Mix well. Done! Your Pineapple Pulissery is ready to serve.

Notes:

  1. You may increase the quantity of coconut you use, if you would so like. Similarly, you may increase the quantity of mustard and cumin you use to grind into a paste. The above quantities were just perfect for us
  2. Use fresh, slightly sour curd for best results. You may increase or decrease the quantity of curd you use, depending upon personal taste preferences.
  3. Make sure all the cores and thorns are removed from the pineapple, before using them in this dish.
  4. Do not overcook the pineapple. They should be just cooked, but still retain some crunch.
  5. Pumpkin, ripe mango, raw mango are some other fruits and vegetables you can use in place of pineapple.
  6. You can even add in some garlic cloves and shallots while grinding the paste. I did not use them.
  7. For best results, use a pineapple that is fresh, nicely ripe, sweet and juicy. Do not use over-ripe pineapple. You may even use canned pineapple.
  8. Coconut oil is ideal for the tempering here.
  9. Do not heat the Pineapple Pulissery after adding in the curd, as that might cause curdling. This dish is meant to be served at room temperature.
  10. The Pineapple Pulissery can be served with rasam or sambar rice or with any other rice preparation. It can also be served as an accompaniment for a full-fledged plantain-leaf spread such as that for Onam sadya.

Did you like the recipe? Do let me know, in your comments!

*************

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #239. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com and Lathi @ From Lathi’s Kitchen.

Sindhi Koki|Flavoured Flatbread With Onion

Sindhi cuisine is relatively unexplored one, at least in the Indian F&B market. Though the cuisine boasts of several beautiful recipes – Sindhi Kadhi, Daal Pakwaan or Sindhi Koki, for instance – they remain largely unknown. Most of these dishes are prepared regularly in Sindhi households, and that is about it. This post of mine is a little attempt to change that – to speak about a cuisine that deserves to be highlighted, whatever little I know about it.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Sindhi Koki, a flatbread that is quite simple to make. With just a few ingredients required, these can be made within a matter of minutes, with no prior preparation needed.

The koki might look deceptively simple from the outside – just like any ordinary flatbread – but one bite into it will surprise you. This flatbread is rich with flavours! The finely chopped onion, green chillies and coriander that go into it render it super flavourful, as do the other aromatic dry spices that are added in.

Sindhi Kokis are traditionally made crisp and chewy, with loads of ghee going into them. Thanks to this texture, they keep well for at least 2-3 days, and make for great travel companions. Personally, though, I prefer making them a little softer, so my aged parents and daughter can enjoy them too.

Here is how I make these Sindhi Koki.

Ingredients (makes about 12 pieces):

  1. 2 cups whole wheat flour
  2. Salt to taste
  3. 1 large onion, finely chopped
  4. 1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder
  5. 2 green chillies, very finely chopped
  6. 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh coriander
  7. 1/2 teaspoon carom seeds (ajwain)
  8. 2 pinches asafoetida
  9. 1 tablespoon amchoor powder, or to taste
  10. 1 tablespoon coriander seed powder (dhania powder), or to taste
  11. 2 tablespoons oil + more to cook the koki

Method:

1. Take the whol wheat flour in a large mixing bowl.

2. Add in the salt to taste, coriander seed powder, asafoetida, amchoor powder, red chilli powder, carom seeds, as well as the finely chopped coriander and onion.

3. Add water little by little and bind a dough that is soft but firm.

4. When you are almost done with binding the dough, add the 2 tablespoons of oil to it. Mix well. Bind the dough to a soft but firm texture. Cover the dough and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.

5. Get a dosa pan nice and hot.

6. Meanwhile, make lemon-sized balls out of the dough. Use a rolling pin to roll one ball out into a circle. Dust with more whole wheat flour as needed.

7. Place the rolled-out dough on the hot dosa pan. Reduce the flame to low-medium, and spread a little oil around it. When the bottom of the flatbread gets brown, flip over. Cook on the other side till brown. Make sure the flatbread is well cooked on the inside, but doesn’t burn.

8. Prepare all the Sindhi koki in a similar manner. Serve hot.

Notes:

  1. Cumin seeds (jeera) can be used in place of carom seeds (ajwain).
  2. Adjust the quantity of red chilli powder, salt, amchoor powder and coriander seed powder as per personal taste preferences.
  3. Traditionally, ghee is used to cook the Sindhi Koki. I have used oil instead.
  4. Typically, the dough for the Sindhi Koki needs to be soft, yet firm. This will yield koki that are crisp and chewy, yet soft. I did not make a firm dough as I wanted soft koki that I could feed my little daughter too.
  5. If you are making this recipe for small kids, you might want to skip using the green chillies altogether.
  6. Traditionally, anardana (pomegranate seed) powder is added to Sindhi Koki for flavour. I did not have any, so I have used amchoor (dry mango) powder instead. I loved the flavour that the amchoor powder added, but you could use anardana powder instead, if you wish to make the koki as close to authentic as possible.
  7. Cook the koki on low-medium flame. Ensure that they are cooked well from the inside, and at the same time, do not burn.
  8. You can add in more oil while binding the dough, if you so desire. Typically, a whole lot of oil is added to the dough, which gives it a softness in spite of its firm texture. I restricted myself to 2 tablespoons.
  9. Serve the Sindhi Koki piping hot. This flatbread goes with any kind of gravy-based sabzi or daal, pickle, curd or raita. I served these with a very South Indian tomato thokku, and we absolutely loved the combination.
  10. If you find it tough to roll out the kokis, you may use a sheet of plastic, butter paper, or parchment paper on top of your rolling surface.

*****************

Foodie Monday Blog HopThis recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The very interesting theme for this week is ‘Indian Flatbreads’.

I’m also sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #237. The co-hosts this week are Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Diann @ Of Goats and Greens.

Kashmiri Wazwan @ Radisson Blu, Marathahalli

I consider myself incredibly lucky for having had the chance to visit Kashmir, the land touted as ‘Paradise on Earth’, not once but twice so far. I am glad I have had a chance to explore a little of the cuisine of this beautiful place, to delve deeper into the food that nourishes the people of this land. Kashmiri cuisine has always surprised me with its out-of-the-box (at least for me) preparations, the use of spices to make food magical, and its simplicity. So, when I was recently invited to partake of a Kashmiri feast at Saffron, Radisson Blu in Marathahalli, I absolutely had to go. I ended up having an absolutely lovely time here, with some great food being served.

This is one food festival you must head to!

Kashmiri Wazwan food festival at Saffron

Saffron, the restaurant at Radisson Blu, Marathahalli, is celebrating a Kashmiri food festival till August 20, 2018. Kashmiri chef Irshad Ahmad Wani and his team are all set to serve to the citizens of Bangalore a feast full of the flavours of his hometown.

The special menu curated for the food festival, called Kashmiri Wazwan, is available only for dinner at Saffron, on an a la carte basis. There are loads of options for vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike, which is something I loved. I also loved that the menu encompasses more than Kashmiri pulao, kahwah and dum aloo, which is what Kashmiri food means to a lot of people.

If you are in ‘uru and have always wanted to try out food from the valley, this is your chance to do so! The food for the festival is being cooked by an actual Kashmiri chef and his team, and is hence as authentic as can be. How cool is that, right?

The ambience at Saffron

Saffron exudes an old-world charm, with its dark wood furniture, high ceilings, and large windows. The decor is simple and understated, yet elegant. There are little, classy pops of art here and there, which add to the charm of the place.

Glimpses of Saffron, the restaurant at Radisson Blu, Marathahalli

The restaurant feels airy and bright, in spite of having a generous number of seats. This is not a dimly-lit place, but one filled with natural sunlight, and I absolutely loved that.

The open kitchen at the back lets you have a view of all the behind-the-scenes action, building up your appetite in the process.

The service was impeccable, the staff attentive yet not hovering. They were brimming with Radisson Blu’s characteristic courtesy, warmth and friendliness.

Food and drinks

Now, let’s take a look at the food and drinks we sampled at Saffron!

We started our meal with Sabzi Badami Shorba, a light vegetable soup with slivers of almond in it. It was subtly spiced, the perfect foil for all the beautiful dishes that were about to be served to us in the course of the meal.

Top: Subzi Badami Shorba; Bottom left and right: Papads and fries with assorted dips

Along with the soup, we were presented a basket of papads and fries, with an assortment of Kashmiri dips. The dips – spicy onion, walnut and curd, radish, and green chilly and mint – were so very lovely. We loved munching on these, especially so because they brought back fond memories of hearty meals we have had while holidaying in Kashmir.

img_20180813_225658891121950.jpg
The starters we tried at the Kashmiri Wazwan food festival. Top Left: Paneer Tikka (Picture Courtesy: Avril’s Food Journee); Bottom Left: Makai Malai Tikki; Bottom Right: Nadru Ki Shaami; Top Right: Zaam Doodh Kebab

Then came the starters. The Paneer Tikka (cottage cheese marinated in spices and grilled) and Makai Malai Tikki (corn and cream cutlets) were presented first, both of which were decent. The paneer was supremely soft and the corn tikkis melt-in-your-mouth, but, again, I felt they could have done with a bit more flavour.

The next starter, Nadru Ki Shaami, cutlets made with lotus stem, didn’t really titillate my tastebuds. They were really well done, but I would have loved some more flavour to them.

The Zaam Doodh Kebab or hung curd patties that were brought to the table next were beautiful – the star of the starters for me. They were just the right amount of sour, perfectly made, and the walnut stuffing within took the taste up several notches.

And then, it was time to move on to the main course.

img_20180813_2303411273739002.jpg
The main course dishes we sampled at Kashmiri Wazwan. Top: Assorted vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes; Bottom Left: Assorted flatbreads with Modur Pulav and a non-vegetarian gravy; Bottom Centre: My main course platter; Bottom Right: Al Yakhni, which stole the show for me

With some wonderful, pillow soft flatbreads, I sampled four vegetarian Kashmiri curries.

The Kashmiri Dum Aloo, baby potatoes cooked Kashmir-style with a yogurt- and tomato-based gravy, was just beautiful.

The Tamatar Chaman, deep-fried cottage cheese cooked in a tomato-fennel gravy, though, was quite average.

The Schuk Wangun, baby eggplants cooked the Kashmiri way with a tomato-and-tamarind base, literally had me licking my fingers. Yes, it was that delish!

It was the Al Yakhni, a yogurt-based preparation with bottlegourd, that stole the show for me. It was so mild, so simple, yet so delicious! Who would have thought bottlegourd could be this fantastic?!

The Modur Pulav that came next – a sweet Kashmiri preparation with basmati rice, dry fruits, nuts and herbs – was brilliant too. It was so fragrant, so subtle, yet an absolute delight to eat.

Left: The First Kiss, a mocktail at Saffron; Top Right: Black Magic, another mocktail; Bottom Right: Kashmiri Kahwah

Along with our meal, we sipped on a couple of mocktails from Saffron’s extensive drink menu. I tried out The First Kiss, a medley of orange, apple and lemon, was very well made and refreshing. I also sampled Black Magic, a mocktail with cola, lemon, ginger and mint that I loved to bits. Please note that the mocktails are not part of the Kashmiri Wazwan menu, but they can be served to you from the regular bar menu if you so desire, at an additional cost.

We washed the food down with some Kashmiri Kahwah, a warm and mildly sweet concoction that was very well brewed.

Phirni and Kesar Ras Malai at Saffron

Our meal ended with the two desserts that are on offer as part of the Kashmiri Wazwan menu – Phirni and Kesar Ras Malai.

I have never been a big fan of the grainy texture of phirni or its taste so, as always, it didn’t excite me too much. The Kesar Ras Malai? Now, that was a different story altogether. It was so very well done, with just the right amount of sweet and thickness. Served cold, with a hint of saffron to it, it was heavenly!

In hindsight…

All of us had a thoroughly enjoyable meal at the Kashmiri Wazwan food festival. I loved most of the food that was served to us, and Saffron’s wonderful hospitality ensured that we had a great experience overall.

Like I was saying earlier, the food took us back to our holidays in Kashmir, making us remember some lovely meals we have had there. The food is, indeed, true-blue Kashmiri, or at least to the extent that that is possible in Bangalore.

Don’t miss this! Head to Saffron at Radisson Blu, Marathahalli, on or before August 20 for your fix of Kashmiri flavours.

************

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #237. The co-hosts this week are Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Diann @ Of Goats and Greens.

Nei Payasam| Kerala Rice Kheer

This year, the festival of Onam falls on August 27. I am eagerly waiting for the day to arrive, so I can lay my hands on a typical Onam sadya (a traditional plantain-leaf feast served on the occasion of Onam). 😉 Till then, I plan to herald the festival on my blog through a series of Onam-special recipes, courtesy of my mother-in-law who hails from Palakkad.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Nei Payasam, a Kerala-style kheer made with matta rice. This payasam is typically served in the course of an Onam sadya. It is also commonly prepared during weddings and other festive occasions, and as an offering to God in the temples of Kerala.

Nei payasam‘ literally translates into ‘kheer with ghee‘, and, true to its name, this kheer is redolent of the goodness of ghee. All of us at home are big fans of this nei payasam, with its coconut-ghee flavour, and slurp it up by the bowlfuls. Yes, the bub included! 🙂

This kheer is traditionally made with jaggery, and is really sweet and rich and heavenly, especially to those with a huge sweet tooth like us. In fact, this dish is often referred to as ‘Kadu Madhura Payasam‘ or ‘kheer that is very sweet’ in Kerala households. I have slightly reduced the quantity of jaggery, ghee and coconut than what is usually used, but the payasam still tasted absolutely beautiful.

Now, without further ado, let’s get to the recipe for this Kerala nei payasam aka kadu madhura payasam, shall we?

Ingredients (serves 4-5):

  1. 1/2 cup broken matta rice
  2. 1 cup jaggery
  3. 1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
  4. 2 pinches of dry ginger powder (optional)
  5. 2 pinches of cardamom (elaichi) powder
  6. 4 tablespoons ghee (divided)
  7. 8-10 cashewnuts
  8. 1 tablespoon raisins

Method:

1. Wash the broken matta rice thoroughly under running water, a couple of times. Drain out all the excess water.

2. Pressure cook the washed and drained rice with 1 cup water for 4 whistles. Let the pressure release naturally.

3. In a heavy-bottomed pan, heat the jaggery together with 2 cups of water. Keep on high flame till the jaggery melts completely. Let the jaggery syrup come to a boil.

4. Now, turn the flame to medium. Add the cooked broken matta rice to the melted jaggery in the pan, along with the fresh grated coconut.

5. Cook on medium flame, stirring intermittently, till the mixture begins to thicken.

6. When the mixture starts thickening add in 2 tablespoons of ghee. Cook for a minute or so more, or till the mixture is thick, yet slightly runny.

7. Add in the dry ginger powder and cardamom powder. Mix well. Cook for a few seconds, then switch off the flame.

8. In another pan, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of ghee. Add in the cashewnuts (broken) and the raisins. Once the raisins plump up, switch off the gas. Ensure the cashewnuts and raisins do not burn.

9. Add the plumped raisins and cashewnuts to the rice-jaggery mixture in the other pan. Mix well.

10. Serve the nei payasam hot, at room temperature or chilled.

Notes:

1. I have used broken matta rice here, which is also called Palakkadan rosematta rice or Kerala red rice. You can use any variety of Kerala rice to make this nei payasam.

2. You can even add slivered almonds to the nei payasam. I haven’t.

3. I have used yellowish-coloured jaggery to make this payasam, which has contributed to its light colour. Traditionally, in Kerala homes, reddish jaggery is used, which gives the payasam a deep reddish-brown hue.

4. Some people add in slices of banana to the payasam, after it is cooked. I have skipped that.

5. The quantities of rice, jaggery, water and ghee above were just perfect for us. You may increase or decrease the quantities of these ingredients, as per personal taste preferences.

6. Make sure the cashewnuts and raisins do not get burnt.

7. For best results, use good-quality grainy ghee and jaggery. Also, ensure that you use freshly grated coconut.

8. You can add in a few slivers of coconut while frying the raisins and cashewnuts. I haven’t.

9. Do not overcook the payasam, as that will lead to the rice getting overly hard. Also, add in the rice when the jaggery has fully melted and the syrup is beginning to boil.

10. Remember that the rice needs to be pressure cooked well, but should not be overlooked. A slightly grainy texture works best for this nei payasam.

11. Switch off the gas when the payasam has thickened considerably, but is still quite runny. It thickens quite a bit more on cooling.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

****************

Foodie Monday Blog HopThis post is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. The theme this week is ‘Onam Recipes’.

I’m also sharing this with Fiesta Friday #236, whose co-hosts this week are Julianna @ Foodie on Board and Debanita @ Canvassed Recipes.

Thai Grapefruit Salad

Did you know that the grapefruit lends itself beautifully to a salad? Grapefruit salad can be super refreshing and super delicious, especially if you make it the Thai way. Thai grapefruit salad is beautiful, bursting with sweet and salty and tangy and spicy flavours.

A few days back, a couple of ruby red grapefruit found their way into my shopping bag. I was picking up our weekly quota of vegetables when I spotted these grapefruit that had been imported from South Africa. Now, I don’t usually buy stuff that isn’t local or seasonal in Bangalore, but I made an exception for these – I wanted to introduce the bub to grapefruit, and I wanted to try this fruit out myself. So, in they went.

Sadly, though, none of us liked the slightly bitter aftertaste the fruit has. I didn’t have the heart to throw out good fruit, and this Thai grapefruit salad is what happened to it. Unlike the fruit itself, the salad was hugely loved by everyone at home; it became an instant hit and was gobbled up within minutes of the making. Like I said before, it was bursting with flavours, quite delicious and refreshing. It was a breeze to put together as well!

Now, the husband is asking me to buy more grapefruit just so we can have more of this lovely salad. 😉

When I posted a picture of this salad on my Instagram and Facebook, I had quite a few people DMing me to ask for the recipe. As promised, here is the recipe for all of you guys.

Here is how I made the Thai grapefruit salad.

Ingredients (serves 2-3):

  1. 1 big ruby red grapefruit
  2. Juice of 1/2 lemon
  3. Salt to taste
  4. 2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander
  5. 2 tablespoons raw cane sugar
  6. 1 green chilly
  7. 2 teaspoons soya sauce or to taste
  8. 2 teaspoons Sriracha sauce or to taste
  9. 1/4 cup peanuts

Method:

1. Dry roast the peanuts on medium flame till crisp. Ensure that they do not burn. Let them cool down completely.

2. Peel the grapefruit and separate the segments. Remove all seeds, skin and pips. Use your hands to make small bite-sized portions of the flesh. Place these in a mixing bowl.

3. Pulse the roasted peanuts a couple of times in a mixer, a couple of seconds each. You should just coarsely crush the peanuts and not make a fine powder. Add the coarsely crushed peanuts to the mixing bowl.

4. Chop the green chilly very finely, and add to the mixing bowl.

5. To the mixing bowl, add salt to taste, raw cane sugar, finely chopped coriander, lemon juice, soya sauce and Sriracha sauce. Mix well, but gently. Serve immediately.

Notes:

  1. If you feel the heat from the Sriracha sauce is enough, skip adding the green chilly.
  2. I used Sriracha sauce from Thai Heritage to make this salad.
  3. I used soya sauce from Ching’s to make this Thai grapefruit salad.
  4. Adjust the quantity of salt, raw cane sugar, lemon juice, soya sauce and Sriracha sauce as per personal taste preferences.
  5. Honey or jaggery powder can be used in place of raw cane sugar. You can even use brown sugar or powdered white refined sugar.
  6. You can use a pomelo (chakota), sweet lime (mosambi) or orange in place of the grapefruit.
  7. Make sure you don’t burn the peanuts while roasting them. Also, they need to be just coarsely crushed and not finely powdered.
  8. Be careful while adding in the salt. The soya sauce will be quite salty too.
  9. The chakota or pomelo is also sometimes referred to as Indian grapefruit. I used a ruby red grapefruit imported from South Africa, to make this salad.

Did you like this recipe? Please do let me know in your comments!

******

I’m sending this recipe to Fiesta Friday #236. The co-hosts this week are Julianna @ Foodie on Board and Debanita @ Canvassed Recipes.

 

Kavuni Arisi Adai| Indian Black Rice Pancakes

Have you ever cooked with black rice? It is an ingredient very new to my kitchen, for I started cooking with black rice fairly recently. These Indian Black Rice Pancakes are something I used it in a while back, and they were so much loved by everyone at home!

Some quick facts about Black Rice

  1. Black rice has a deep black colour, which comes from the anthocyanins present in them. Anthocyanins are a family of antioxidants that are present in foods with a similar colour, such as blackberries and blueberries.
  2. The anthocyanins in black rice help in preventing cancer and heart disease, regulate blood sugar, and reduce the absorption of cholesterol. This rice is higher in fibre and protein than ordinary white rice, too. It has a high level of iron and Vitamin E. It has a lower number of calories than brown rice.
  3. Black rice has a mild, nutty taste that lends itself well to both sweet and savoury dishes. The rice turns purplish in hue when cooked.
  4. Black rice is majorly grown in tropical areas like North-East region in India, as well as in China, Indonesia, Thailand and Myanmar. There might be variations in the types of black rice grown at each of these places.
  5. Considering that black rice is so high in nutrition, it was once reserved only for royalty in China. Only rulers and their families would be allowed to eat it, due to which it was given the name ‘Forbidden Rice’. Though the rice is still referred to as Forbidden Rice at times, it is now widely available in supermarkets and health stores across India.
  6. In spite of its high nutritional content, black rice still remains a largely unexplored ingredient in India. The Chettinad region of Tamil Nadu, though, has been using this rice since ages. The Chettiars or the locals of this region, mostly traders, would often travel for business to Indonesia and Burma (now Myanmar), and would bring back packets of black rice with them. The Chettiars call this rice Burma Rice or ‘Kavuni Arisi‘, and largely use it in a sweet preparation called ‘Kavuni Arisi Halwa‘.
  7. Black rice is also referred to as Purple Rice or Magic Rice.
  8. It is different from Wild Rice.
  9. For best results, black rice should be soaked overnight before cooking. It is best cooked in a pan, covered, with twice the amount of water. Care should be taken to ensure that it is cooked just enough, as overcooking will make it quite sticky and mushy.
  10. In North-East India, black rice is commonly used to make a sweet dish called Chak-hao.

Recipe for Indian Black Rice Pancakes

In Bangalore, black rice has been making an appearance lately on the menus of new-age cafes, mostly in the forms of salad and pudding. I decided to use it in a savoury preparation, a very South Indian one at that – Indian-style pancakes or adai.

The Kavuni Arisi Adai tasted lovely, and the addition of onions took the taste higher by several notches. Thanks to the urad daal in it, it turned out super soft too. Actually, I added in a variety of lentils to the batter – even some of the black moth daal that I picked up in Kashmir. Super nutritious, with all those whole grains in!

 

Here’s how I made the Indian Black Rice pancakes or Kavuni Arisi Adai.

Ingredients (yields 28-30 pancakes):

For the batter:

  1. 1 cup black rice or kavuni arisi
  2. 1/2 teaspoon fenugreek (methi) seeds
  3. 1/2 cup raw rice
  4. 1/2 cup Kashmiri black moth daal
  5. 1/2 cup chana daal
  6. 1/2 cup split black urad daal
  7. 1/2 cup toor daal
  8. Salt, to taste
  9. 7-8 dry red chillies
  10. 6-7 cloves of garlic, peeled
  11. A 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and chopped finely
  12. 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves

To make the pancakes:

  1. Oil, as needed
  2. Finely chopped onion, as needed (optional)
  3. Finely chopped coriander, as needed (optional)

Method:

  1. Place the black rice, chana daal, fenugreek seeds, urad daal, raw rice, toor daal and Kashmiri moth daal together in a large vessel. Wash these ingredients well under running water a couple of times. Then, drain out all the water.
  2. Add in enough fresh water to cover all of these ingredients. Cover the vessel with a lid. Let the ingredients soak for 8-10 hours or overnight.
  3. When the soaking time is over, drain out the excess water from these ingredients. Grind half of the ingredients to a coarse batter, in a mixer jar. Transfer the ground batter to a large vessel.
  4. Now, take the rest of the soaked ingredients in the mixer jar. Add in dry red chillies, peeled garlic cloves, and peeled and chopped ginger. Grind coarsely. Add this batter to the one we ground earlier.
  5. Add salt to taste to the batter, as well as curry leaves. Mix well. The batter is now ready to use to make pancakes or adai.
  6. When you are ready to make the adai, add finely chopped onion and coriander to the batter (optional), as needed. You may even add in finely chopped green chillies, as needed. To make the adai, heat a dosa pan well on high flame. Now, reduce the flame to medium. Place a ladleful of the batter in the centre of the pan, and spread it out. Add some oil all around the adai. When cooked on the bottom, flip it over. Cook on the other side too, on medium flame. Serve immediately.

Notes:

1. I used Sona Masoori raw rice in the batter. You can use any type of raw rice that you prefer.

2. I used Manipuri black rice from Happy Healthy Me, to make these adai.

3. If you do not have Kashmiri black moth daal, you can entirely skip adding that to the batter.

4. This batter does not need any fermenting, and can be used immediately after grinding. However, if you want a slight sourness to the adai, you may set aside the batter, covered, at room temperature for fermenting for a few hours.

5. If you do not plan on using the batter immediately, you can store it in the refrigerator. It keeps well for 2-3 days.

6. Add the onion, coriander and green chillies (if using) just before you begin preparing the adai. It is totally optional to add these, but I would highly recommend that you do.

7. I had a bit of batter left over after making these adai, with onion and coriander added, and used it to make kuzhi paniyaram. Those also turned out absolutely lovely, soft and delicious!

fb_img_1533558583005-012110993449.jpeg

8. These Kavuni Arisi Adai do not really need an accompaniment. However, they go well with powdered jaggery or a simple South Indian coconut chutney.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

Also, would you like to see more black rice recipes on my blog?

******

I’m sending this recipe to Fiesta Friday #236. The co-hosts this week are Julianna @ Foodie on Board and Debanita @ Canvassed Recipes.

Gujarati Dalwada| Mixed Lentil Fritters

We don’t do much of deep frying at home. It is only occasionally that we indulge in deep-fried snacks, sometimes to commemorate a special occasion, sometimes because the bub likes them, sometimes because we desperately crave for them. Right about now, the weather in Bangalore is perfect for deep-fried goodies – cloudy but bright mornings, followed by short showers in the evening. I absolutely had to dish up some Gujarati dalwada, one of my most favourite fried snacks!

37380873_838567476332670_3294111870172004352_n

If you have never had Gujarati dalwada before, you must absolutely try them out right away. They are so delightful – crunchy from the outside and soft on the inside, beautiful in taste. I have grown up eating them on rainy days and, even today, I cannot think of monsoon without thinking of these beauties. A newspaper cone full of these dalwadas, served with some fried green chillies and salt-soaked thinly sliced onions, spells out B-L-I-S-S to me.

Different people make dalwada in different ways. Some use only split green moong to make them, while some use a mix of lentils of their choice. I prefer the latter, using a mix of lentils and some rice, as I feel this gives a much better texture and taste to the dalwadas. Today, I will share with you the recipe for mixed-lentil Gujarati dalwada, the way a friend of mine taught me to make them.

Here’s how to make Gujarati dalwada or mixed lentil fritters.

Ingredients (serves 5-6):

For the dalvadas:

  1. 1-1/2 cups split green moong
  2. 1/4 cup chana daal
  3. 1/4 cup split yellow moong daal
  4. 1/4 cup urad daal (whole or split)
  5. 1/4 cup raw rice
  6. Salt, to taste
  7. A 1-inch fat piece of ginger
  8. 8-10 cloves of garlic
  9. 6-8 green chillies, or as per taste
  10. A small bunch of fresh coriander leaves
  11. Oil, as needed for deep frying

For serving (optional):

  1. Onions, as needed
  2. Green chillies, as needed
  3. Salt, as needed
  4. Lemon slices, as needed

Method:

  1. Wash the split green moong, split yellow moong daal, urad daal, chana daal and raw rice together thoroughly under running water, a couple of times. Drain out all the extra water.
  2. Place all the washed and drained ingredients in a large vessel, and pour in enough fresh water to cover them completely. Let these ingredients soak for at least 3-4 hours.
  3. Once the above ingredients are done soaking, drain out the water from them. You can reserve this water to use while grinding the batter or throw it away – that’s completely your choice. Transfer the soaked and drained ingredients to a mixer jar. Do not add in any water at this stage – just the soaked and drained ingredients.
  4. Chop the green chillies finely. Peel the ginger and chop it finely. Peel the garlic cloves. Add the green chillies, ginger and garlic to the mixer jar.
  5. Add salt to taste to the mixer jar.
  6. Grind the ingredients in the mixer jar coarsely. Pulse a couple of times for two seconds each, stopping in between to scrape down the sides of the jar. Remember that you need to coarsely crush the ingredients and not make a fine paste. You can add in a little of the soaking water you might have reserved earlier, if needed, while grinding. If you don’t feel the need to add any water while grinding, you need not add any. The batter needs to be thick and not runny.
  7. Chop the coriander finely and add it to the batter you just ground. Mix well and keep aside.
  8. Heat oil for deep frying in a heavy-bottomed pan. When it reaches smoking point, turn down the flame to medium. Drop balls of batter into the hot oil, 4-5 at a time. Deep fry evenly till the dalwadas turn brown. Serve hot.
  9. Gujarati dalwadas are typically served with thinly sliced onions mixed with a little salt, deep-fried green chillies with a little salt sprinkled on them, and slices of lemon. If you want to serve the dalwadas the traditional way, make sure you prep the onions, green chillies and lemon slices at the same time as the dalwadas get fried and ready. Alternatively, you can serve these fritters with tomato ketchup, though that isn’t something I personally prefer – I’d go for the traditional way, any day!

Notes:

  1. You can skip the garlic in the dalwadas, if you don’t prefer it. Personally, though, I would suggest adding it, as it takes up the taste of the dalwadas higher by several notches.
  2. Adjust the quantity of green chillies you use, depending upon how spicy you want the dalwadas to be.
  3. My mom makes these dalwadas using just split green moong. She soaks 2-3 cups of split green moong for 3-4 hours, then drains out the excess water and grinds it with green chillies, garlic and salt to taste. Mom’s dalwadas are delish too, but I prefer the ones I make, with raw rice, urad daal, split moong daal and chana daal added in.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

******

I’m sending this recipe to Fiesta Friday #235. The co-hosts this week are Mara @ Put on Your Cake Pants and Hilda @ Along the Grapevine.

I’m also sharing this with Friday Frenzy.