Pineapple Kesari Bhat| Pineapple Rava Kesari

Celebrations are in order!

The Foodie Monday Blog Hop group that I am part of has turned 200! Quite a big achievement this is, #200NotOut, an occasion that warrants a special recipe. So, here’s presenting to you – Pineapple Kesari Bhat aka Pineapple Sheera or Pineapple Rava Kesari.

I’m sure you guys would have noticed me presenting a new recipe every Monday, based on a certain theme. Well, that’s the way the Foodie Monday Blog Hop works. I joined the group when the group had just reached the milestone of 100 weeks, and have absolutely loved journeying with the other fellow foodies in the group, this far.

The Foodie Monday Blog Hop bloggers surely are a talented bunch, and we have creative themes coming up every week. Over the years, we have talked, discussed, shared ideas, suggested tips and tricks, exchanged recipes, critiqued, met and shared food, bonded. And through it all, I have grown.

The group has stretched my horizons, helped me better my cooking from different cuisines around the world. My photography has definitely improved, from where I started out from. I structure my posts better now, and this group has played an important role in that. Learnings – big and small – have been manifold.

For the 200th episode of the Foodie Monday Blog Hop, we members decided to cook from each other’s blogs. I was assigned Renu’s blog, Cook With Renu, which is a beautiful collection of many recipes from around the world. Several interesting bakes feature therein as well. I chose this recipe to recreate from her blog, because all of us at home love Pineapple Kesari Bhat to bits, including the bub.

Pineapple Kesari Bhat is a version of sheera redolent of ghee and fruit that you will come across in several restaurants across Bangalore. I have also encountered it at a few places in Madras, and have been served this sweet treat during meals at weddings and other festive occasions. It surely is a gorgeous thing, something you must definitely try out, especially so if you love pineapple.

Let’s now check out how I made the Pineapple Kesari Bhat, with a few variations to Renu’s recipe.

Ingredients (serves 4):

  1. 3/4 cup fine rava (sooji or semolina)
  2. 2 tablespoons + 2 tablespoons of ghee
  3. 1 tablespoon raisins
  4. 10-12 cashewnuts
  5. 1-1/2 cups water
  6. 3/4 cup sugar
  7. 1 heaped cup chopped pineapple, cores and thorns removed

Method:

1. Grind the pineapple pieces to a coarse puree, in a mixer. Keep aside.

2. Chop up the cashewnuts roughly. Keep aside.

3. Heat 2 tablespoons ghee in a pan. Add the rava to the pan. Roast the rava, keeping the flame medium, till it attains a consistency like wet sand and becomes fragrant. This should take 1-2 minutes. Take care to ensure that the rava does not burn.

4. Transfer the roasted rava to a plate. Keep aside.

5. Heat the water in the same pan, on high flame, till it reaches boiling point.

6. Now, turn the heat down to medium and add the roasted rava to the pan, a little at a time. Stir constantly, to avoid lumps forming.

7. Add the sugar to the pan, along with the pineapple puree. Mix well. Let the mixture cook on medium heat for about 2 minutes or till it starts to thicken. Stir intermittently.

8. Meanwhile, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of ghee in another pan. Add the cashewnuts and raisins to the ghee. Fry on low heat till the raisins plump up and the cashewnuts brown. Take care to ensure that they do not burn. Add the ghee along with the fried cashewnuts and raisins to the mixture in the other pan. Mix well.

9. When the mixture has thickened up but is still a bit runny, switch off the gas. The Pineapple Kesari Bhat thickens further on cooling. Serve the kesari hot or at room temperature.

Notes:

1. Use a ripe, juicy, sweet pineapple for best results. However, make sure it is not overly ripe.

2. Make sure all the cores and thorns from the pineapple are removed, before using it in the sheera.

3. Grinding the chopped pineapple coarsely ensures that you get little bits and pieces of the fruit in your mouth while eating. Considering everyone in my family loves that, I keep the puree coarse. However, you may puree it smoothly too if you so prefer.

4. Use fine sooji or rava in this Pineapple Kesari Bhat recipe, for best results.

5. Use good-quality ghee, adjusting the quantity as per personal taste preferences. The above quantity of ghee worked out just perfectly for us.

6. Adjust the quantity of water, depending upon how runny you want the Pineapple Rava Kesari to be. You can also cook the kesari in a mix of milk and water.

7. I have used raisins and cashewnuts in this Pineapple Rava Kesari. You may even add in almonds.

8. Make sure you are stirring constantly while adding the roasted rava to the boiling water in the pan. This is important to ensure that there are no lumps.

9. The Pineapple Rava Kesari thickens on cooling, so make sure you switch off the flame while it is still on the runnier side.

10. Food colour is sometimes added to Pineapple Rava Kesari to give it a pretty golden yellow or orange hue. I haven’t used any here.

11. Jaggery can be used in place of sugar here, but it alters the taste of the dish. I like this version with sugar, as does everyone else in my family, so I prefer this. And it’s a once-in-a-while indulgence anyway.

12. It is not uncommon to add a pinch of salt or a few cloves to kesari, too stop the sweetness from getting too overwhelming. I don’t use these.

I hope you will try out this recipe! Do share your feedback, in your comments.

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Instant Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram| Healthy Finger Millet Snack

I’m sure all of us are aware of the many health benefits contained in ragi aka finger millet. I myself have waxed eloquent on this subject several times over, on this blog. Rich in fibre, iron and calcium, among other nutrients, low in calories and easily digestible, ragi is an excellent food for weight-watchers, healthy eaters and diabetics, as well as babies, toddlers and growing children. Today, I present to you the recipe for a delicious, healthy snack made using ragi – Instant Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram.

Roasted ragi porridge was the very first food we fed the bub, when she was ready to take solids. She still eats the porridge for breakfast every once in a while. I, however, didn’t grow up consuming ragi, and was not very fond of it per se, to be honest. Life in Bangalore and parenting acquainted me with the many delicious things that can be made using ragi, and I am now quite in love with some of the dishes we use it in at home often. This Instant Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram, for instance.

With the sour buttermilk, curry leaves and green chillies that go into them, these Instant Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram are supremely delicious. They are quite easy to make too, and make for just the perfect snack when you are looking for something healthy but delish and filling.

This dish can be easily be made gluten-free too, if you only skip the asafoetida used in the tempering.

Check out the recipe for the Instant Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram!

Ingredients (makes about 28 pieces):

  1. 2 cups ragi (finger millet) flour
  2. 4 tablespoons rice flour
  3. Salt to taste
  4. 1 cup sour curd
  5. 2-4 green chillies
  6. A handful of curry leaves
  7. About 2 teaspoons Eno Fruit Salt
  8. 1 teaspoon oil + more as needed to make the paniyaram
  9. 2 pinches asafoetida
  10. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds

Method:

1. Take the ragi flour in a large mixing bowl. Add in the rice flour, salt to taste and sour curd.

2. Chop the green chillies into large pieces and add to the mixing bowl.

3. Tear the curry leaves roughly with your hands and add them to the mixing bowl too.

4. Heat the oil in a small pan, and add in the mustard. Let it sputter. Add the asafoetida and let it stay in for a couple of seconds. Add this tempering to the mixing bowl.

5. Mix the contents of the bowl well to a thick batter, similar to idli batter. You may add a bit of water while mixing. Ensure that there are no lumps in the batter.

6. Heat up a paniyaram pan on high flame, and add some oil in each of the cavities.

7. You will be making the paniyaram in four batches or so. Take the batter for the first batch in a separate bowl, and add in about 1/2 teaspoon Eno. Mix well. Pour the batter into the greased cavities of the paniyaram pan, till about 3/4. Cook covered on medium heat for 2-3 minutes or until they fluff up into balls and are well done on the bottom. Then, use a fork to turn the balls over. Drizzle a little oil around the balls and cook, covered, till they are done on the other side too – about 2 minutes. Transfer the cooked paniyaram to a serving plate.

8. Make paniyaram using the rest of the batter in the same way, in three more batches. Serve hot, with chutney of your choice.

Notes:

1. I have used store-bought ragi flour here.

2. For best results, use curd that is quite sour.

3. Add just enough water to make a thick batter. Too much water will make a runny batter, resulting in imperfect paniyaram.

4. Add 1/2 teaspoon of Eno Fruit Salt in each batch of the batter, just before it goes into the paniyaram pan. This is critical. Adding all the Eno at one go will not yield fluffy paniyaram.

5. Use 2 fresh packets of Eno Fruit Salt, for best results. Do not use old packets.

6. Use regular, unflavoured Eno Fruit Salt.

7. Baking soda can be used in place of the Eno too. I have not tried it out yet, though.

8. Finely chopped onions and other veggies can be added to the paniyaram too. I haven’t.

9. I prefer cooking the paniyaram covered, so they are done evenly and are crisp on the outside.

10. I use ordinary refined oil in these Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram.

11. I have a small pan that makes 7 paniyaram at a time. So I have divided the batter into four parts, cooking one batch at a time. If you have a larger pan, you can reduce the number of batches you cook the paniyaram in. Adjust the quantity of Eno you use accordingly, in that case.

12. A simple coconut chutney goes beautifully with these Ragi Kuzhi Paniyaram.

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This recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop that I am part of. Every Monday, a group of us food bloggers get together to present recipes based on a pre-determined theme.

The theme this week is #RagiTales, suggested by Poonam of Annapurna. Poonam’s blog is something you must check out, for her very well-explained recipes from around the world. For the theme, we are all showcasing dishes made using the very versatile ragi aka finger millet.

I’m also sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #279. The co-hosts this week are Liz @ Spades, Spatulas & Spoons and Jenny @ Apply To Face Blog

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

Mawa Gulab Jamun Recipe| How To Make Gulab Jamun With Khoya

As much as I love everyday stove-top cooking, the making of Indian sweets is one thing that scares me. My mom is famous in the family circuit for the beautiful 7-Cup Barfis, Badam Barfi, Coconut Barfi and Gajar Halwa that she turns out, among many other delectable desserts, but I have always shied away from these. The making of traditional, Indian sweet dishes is a task that daunts me to no end. On festival days or when we have guests over, I stick to making a simple fusion dessert or taking the safe way out with Sakkarai Pongal or Payasam. This is a barrier I had to break, and I did just that with this Mawa Gulab Jamun recipe, recently.

My little daughter is a big fan of gulab jamun, just as everyone else in my family is. After all, who wouldn’t love these balls of bliss, soaked to perfection in sugar syrup? After beginning to conquer my fears with regards to baking, it made sense to start doing the same with a traditional Indian sweet that the bub loved – Gulab Jamun. So, one fine day last week, Amma and I stood side by side in my kitchen making gulab jamuns from scratch with khoya, she pouring out her years of expertise on the subject, me soaking it all in, taking mental notes and making the dessert under her watchful eye. The results were spectacular, I must say, and the gulab jamun went on to be devoured the very same day. The eating proved that this particular pudding was done just right.

That said, I am amazed at how much of that fear was all in my head. Making gulab jamuns from scratch was not at all the hugely difficult task I had thought it would be. It needs patience, yes, but it is also one of the easiest of Indian sweets to conquer. The tricks here are to be gentle with the mixing and do the frying right, and the rest automatically falls into place. I’m so very glad I did this, and hope my lucky stretch continues with the other, tougher Indian desserts that I plan to try out soon.

There are a few different ways to make gulab jamun, one of them being with khoya or mawa. Khoya refers to the milk solids that are left over after cooking milk on the stovetop for a long, long time. Considering how much of a time-consuming process the making of khoya is, we resorted to a store-bought version. A mix of maida and fine sooji has been used here to bind the jamuns, and you can use either.

Come, let me show you how to make gulab jamun with khoya, a la Amma. Here’s presenting the Mawa Gulab Jamun recipe!

Ingredients (makes about 22 small pieces):

  1. 200 grams khoya aka mawa
  2. 2 tablespoons fine sooji aka semolina or rava
  3. 2 tablespoons maida
  4. 1 tablespoon warm milk or as needed
  5. Oil as needed for deep-frying
  6. 1-1/2 cups sugar
  7. 2 cups water
  8. 1/2 teaspoon rose essence (optional)
  9. 1/2 teaspoon cardamom powder

Method:

1. Take the khoya in a large mixing bowl. Crumble it gently, using your hands. Alternatively, you may grate it.

2. Add the sooji and the maida to the mixing bowl. Mix together gently.

3. Add just enough warm milk as needed to bring the mixture to a dough-like consistency.

4. Heat oil as needed for deep frying, in a pan. Meanwhile, keep the dough covered.

5. Simultaneously, take the water in another pan, add the sugar to it, and place on high flame. Allow the sugar to get completely dissolved in the water. Cook on medium heat till the sugar syrup attains half-thread consistency or till it thickens a little. Switch off gas. Add the rose essence (if using) and cardamom powder to the syrup. Mix well. The syrup for soaking the gulab jamuns is ready. Keep aside.

6. When the oil is nice and hot, reduce flame to medium. Greasing your palms with a little oil, make small balls out of the dough we prepared earlier. Deep fry these balls in the hot oil till brown on the outside, about four at a time, taking care not to burn them.

7. As soon as one batch of the balls are fried and ready, drop them into the sugar syrup. Let them sit undisturbed and soak in the syrup. Continue till all the balls are soaked in syrup.

8. Serve the gulab jamun hot or after allowing them to soak for a few hours. Store the unused ones at room temperature, in a clean, dry, air-tight box.

Notes:

1. Make sure the khoya is at room temperature when you begin to make the gulab jamun.

2. Use great-quality khoya from a known source, for best results. I used Milky Mist khoya, which is entirely made using milk solids, with no added flavouring agents or preservatives.

3. Make sure you prepare the ‘dough’ for the gulab jamun using very gentle hands. Gather the ingredients together, using gentle, light movements, rather than kneading them together. This is imperative for getting soft, melt-in-the-mouth gulab jamuns.

4. I have used a mix of fine sooji (aka semolina or rava) and maida in this Mawa Gulab Jamun recipe. You can skip either of these ingredients – just increase the quantity of the other ingredient you are using, in that case.

5. Make sure you fry the gulab jamuns at medium heat. This will help them get evenly cooked, on the inside and the outside. Cooking them on high heat will turn them brown on the outside, but keep them raw inside.

6. You can fry the gulab jamuns in ghee instead of oil. I have used ordinary refined oil here.

7. Do not crowd the pan, while frying the gulab jamun. Fry them in batches, a few at a time. Drop them in the sugar syrup immediately.

8. Make sure the gulab jamuns are not crowded while they are soaking in the syrup. Use a large pan to soak them.

9. Do not overcook the sugar syrup. Stop cooking when the syrup is slightly thick or has attained half-thread consistency.

10. You can skip using the rose essence in the syrup. Real rose petals can be added instead – make sure you use clean, organic, sweet-smelling flowers in that case.

11. Use warm – not hot – milk to bind the ingredients for the gulab jamun. Make sure you use just as much as needed. The dough should be just right to roll into balls and not too sticky or watery.

12. In case the dough gets a bit sticky, you can use a little more fine sooji or maida to adjust it.

13. Use only fine sooji in the Mawa Gulab Jamun recipe, if you are using it at all. Do not use the larger, grainier variety.

14. I have kept the gulab jamun small here, but you could make them bigger as well. Remember that they increase in size further on soaking.

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Foodie Monday Blog HopI’m sharing this recipe with the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. Every Monday, a group of us food bloggers get together and share recipes based on a pre-determined theme. The theme this Monday is #EidWithFoodies, wherein we are all presenting dishes for the festival of Eid that is just around the corner. I thought this Mawa Gulab Jamun recipe was just perfect for the season.

I’m also sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #278.

Godhumai Rava Upma Kozhukattai| Wheat Dalia Pidi Kozhukattai

Pidi Kozhukattai or Upma Kozhukattai is an all-time favourite breakfast or snack option at our place, with everyone in the family loving it. It is the dish I often resort to making when I have members from the extended family over. This Tamil Nadu special is quite simple to make, after all, and a steamed snack that needs very minimal oil. Traditionally made using rice and a lentil (either chana daal, moong daal or toor daal), Pidi Kozhukattai makes for a healthy, wholesome and hearty snack. Today, I present to you the recipe for Wheat Dalia Pidi Kozhukattai, a healthier version of the traditional dish made using broken wheat.

For years, I made Pidi Kozhukattai the traditional way, using rice. It is only in recent times that I started making them with alternative grains like corn dalia and broken wheat. I am pretty pleased with the outcome, I must say. The use of alternative grains has rendered the dish all the more healthier, yet delicious and wholesome as always. This Wheat Dalia Pidi Kozhukattai is now a much-loved dish in my household – in fact, this version is made quite often at my place, and we hardly miss the one with rice!

Wheat dalia – also called broken wheat, Godhumai Rava in Tamil – has long been recommended by nutritionists and dieticians as a healthier alternative to rice, especially for diabetics. These Wheat Dalia Pidi Kozhukattai are, therefore, great for those afflicted with diabetes and, in general, for those who want to eat healthier. They are entirely plant-based, suitable for vegans. If you simply omit the asafoetida used in this recipe, it becomes a gluten-free dish as well.

Do try these lovelies out and let me know how you liked them!

Here’s how I make the Wheat Dalia Pidi Kozhukattai or Godhumai Rava Upma Kozhukattai.

Ingredients (makes about 12 pieces):

  1. 1 cup broken wheat
  2. 1/4 cup chana daal
  3. 2 dry red chillies
  4. 1 tablespoon oil
  5. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  6. 2 pinches of asafoetida
  7. 1 sprig curry leaves
  8. A 1-inch piece of ginger
  9. 2 green chillies
  10. 2-1/2 cups water
  11. Salt to taste
  12. 1/4 cup fresh grated coconut

Method:

1. Grind the broken wheat, dry red chillies and chana daal together, coarsely. Keep aside.

2. Peel the ginger and chop finely. Chop the green chillies into large pieces. Keep aside.

3. Heat oil in a pan. Add the mustard seeds and allow them to sputter. Now add the chopped ginger and green chillies to the pan, along with the asafoetida. Roughly tear the curry leaves with your hands and add them to the pan. Mix all the ingredients and let them stay in for 3-4 seconds. Make sure the ingredients do not burn.

4. Add the 2-1/2 cups of water to the pan, along with salt to taste. Mix well.

5. Keep the flame high, and let the water come to a boil. Now, reduce the heat to medium and add in the fresh grated coconut and the broken wheat mix we ground earlier. Stir constantly to ensure that no lumps are formed.

6. Stirring constantly, cook on medium heat for 3-4 minutes or till all the ingredients begin to come together, the water starts to dry out and the mixture begins to resemble upma. Switch off gas.

7. Allow the mixture to cool down a bit, covered so it doesn’t dry out too much.

8. When the mixture is cool enough to handle, grease a colander with a little oil, for steaming. Form about 12 oblong dumplings out of the mixture, using your greased hands. Place the dumplings in the greased colander.

9. Take about 1 cup of water in a pressure cooker bottom. Place a high stand over it, then place the colander with the dumplings on top of this. Make sure water will not touch the dumplings.

10. Close the pressure cooker. Do not put the whistle on. Cook the dumplings on high heat for 10-12 minutes.

11. Let the dumplings cool down slightly before handling them. Serve them hot or at room temperature, with chutney of your choice.

Notes:

1. The broken wheat I used was quite big in size, so I ground it up coarsely along with the chana daal and dry red chillies. I just barely crushed it, and did not make a fine powder. If you are using fine broken wheat, there is no need to grind it.

2. I have not washed the broken wheat or chana daal. I just coarsely ground them, dry. Alternatively, you could soak the chana daal and dry red chillies for 15-20 minutes in a little water, then grind them and then use the paste.

3. Do not overcook the broken wheat mixture, otherwise the kozhukattai might turn out hard. Cook it just until the water begins to dry up and it attains a consistency similar to upma. It hardens a bit more on cooling.

4. Adjust the quantity of coconut, green chillies and dry red chillies as per personal taste preferences.

5. Steam the kozhukattai for not more than 10-12 minutes, otherwise they might turn hard.

6. Wait for the steamed kozhukattai to cool down a little before you handle them, or they might break.

7. Simple coconut chutney is the best accompaniment to these broken wheat kozhukattai.

8. Traditionally, pidi kozhukattai are given an oblong shape, like I have here, or a round, ball-like shape. You can go with any shape you prefer.

9. You can even dry roast the broken wheat till fragrant, before you start making the upma kozhukattai. I haven’t.

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This recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. Every Monday, a group of us food bloggers share recipes based on a pre-determined theme.

The theme this week is #GetInShape, suggested by Kalyani of Sizzling Tastebuds. For this hugely interesting theme, all of us are sharing how to make foods that have a geometric shape. After quite a bit of deliberation, I decided to go ahead with this Broken Wheat Upma Kozhukattai recipe.

I’m also sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #277. The co-hosts this week are Diann @ Of Goats and Greens and Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook.

Amtekayi Uppinkayi| Instant Indian Hog Plum Pickle

Have you had the pleasure of biting into an Indian hog plum? If you haven’t, I would suggest you try to get your hands on some as soon as you can. It is a wonderful thing, this hog plum – it will make your mouth pucker with its sourness and refresh your taste buds like very few other foods will. No wonder it lends itself beautifully to things like pickles, gojju or the South Indian version of a relish, chutney and the likes. Today, I am going to present to you the recipe for a very delicious Instant Indian Hog Plum Pickle.

For the uninitiated, the Indian hog plum is a fruit that becomes available in Karnataka, particularly the coastal regions of Udupi and Mangalore, towards the end of summer. I understand it is also available in parts of Goa and Maharashtra too. The fruit has the scientific name of Spondias Mombin, while it goes by various other local names (‘Amtekayi‘ in Kannada, ‘Ambade‘ in Tulu, ‘Amra Kai‘ in Tamil, ‘Ambazhanga‘ in Malayalam and ‘Adavi Mamidi‘ in Telugu). From a distance, Indian hog plums look similar to baby mangoes, with their glossy green skin and slightly elongated shape – it is for this reason that some people also refer to the fruit as ‘Wild Mango’. Some also call this fruit ‘Ambarella‘.

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Tender Indian hog plums, with an undeveloped seed inside

Taste-wise, the Indian hog plum is not unlike a raw mango – quite sour. However, unlike a raw mango, it has a crunchy texture to it. Hog plums can be tossed with some salt and chilli powder and eaten raw or, like I was saying earlier, be used in dishes like pickles, chutney and relishes. It can also be used as a souring agent in various dishes, in place of green mango or tamarind.

The fruit possesses a number of health benefits, too – it is rich in Vitamin A and C as well as iron. Consumption of the hog plum aids in improving eye health, at the same time aiding in keeping one’s skin and hair healthy. They help in preventing anaemia, and in keeping cold and cough at bay. They are good for regulating one’s body temperature, keeping bad cholesterol under check and in preventing ailments of the gums and teeth. They also aid in controlling indigestion and constipation, as well as alleviating loss of appetite and anorexia. The leaves and bark of the tree are also used in traditional Indian medicine, for the treatment of ailments like diarrhoea, inflammation, cystitis and stomach ache.

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Amtekayi Uppinkayi or Instant Indian Hog Plum Pickle

The last couple of summers, I have been pickling these hog plums, in the same style as my mother makes raw mango pickle. This is an instant pickle – one that is very simple to make and does not require much prior preparation – and can be used immediately. This Amtekayi Uppinkayi (Indian hog plum pickle, in Kannada) tastes supremely delicious, making for a lovely accompaniment to curd rice. You have to try this out, I say!

Here is how I made the Instant Indian Hog Plum Pickle:

Ingredients (makes about 1 cupful):

  1. 20 hog plums
  2. 2 tablespoons salt
  3. 4 tablespoons red chilli powder
  4. 1/2 tablespoon turmeric powder
  5. 1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  6. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  7. 1/4 cup oil

Method:

  1. Wash the hog plums well under running water, making sure all traces of dirt on them are removed. Pat dry using a cotton cloth, and sun-dry for an hour or so. Ensure that the hog plums are completely dry before you use them in making the pickle.
  2. Remove the stems from the dried hog plums, and chop them into cubes. Keep aside, in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Grind together the rock salt, turmeric powder, fenugreek seeds, red chilli powder and mustard seeds in a small mixer jar. You can keep the powder as fine or as coarse as you prefer. Transfer this spice mix to the mixing bowl.
  4. Take the oil in a small pan and place it on high flame. When it gets nice and hot, switch off the gas. Pour the hot oil over the hog plum pieces in the mixing bowl.
  5. Immediately mix the pickle gently, using a clean, dry spoon.
  6. When the pickle has come to room temperature, transfer it to a clean, dry, air-tight bottle (preferably glass or steel).
  7. Allow the pickle to soak for a couple of days at room temperature, mixing it up about twice a day for all the hog plum pieces to get evenly coated in the pickling spices. Keep it in the refrigerator after that, to avoid spoiling.

Notes:

  1. Buy tender, firm, unblemished hog plums for best results. It is easier to chop the fruits when tender, including the undeveloped seeds in them. The more mature ones tend to be fibrous, with fibrous seeds, and get difficult to chop and consume.
  2. There is no need to peel the hog plums before using them. Just chop them into cubes or into roundels and use them in making the pickle.
  3. If the hog plum seeds have started becoming fibrous, do remove and discard them before using in the pickle.
  4. I use rock salt (kallu uppu in Tamil) to make this pickle. You may use regular table salt instead, too.
  5. Sesame oil (nalla ennai in Tamil) is the best for making this Amtekayi Uppinkayi. It lends a beautiful fragrance and flavour to the pickle. However, in the absence of sesame oil, you may use any other oil of your preference.
  6. Adjust the quantities of salt, turmeric powder, asafoetida, fenugreek seeds, red chilli powder and mustard seeds you use, depending upon personal taste preferences. The above quantities work perfectly for us.
  7. Since we are making the Amtekayi Uppinkayi with limited salt and oil, it tends to spoil easily. I therefore keep it stored in the refrigerator, when not in use. When refrigerated and used hygienically, the pickle stays well for over a month.
  8. I prefer making this pickle in small quantities and consuming it quickly. You can make it in larger quantities too, but then you will need to be really careful about its storage and use.
  9. Use only a clean, dry, air-tight bottle (preferably steel or glass) to store the pickle. Use a clean, dry spoon only.
  10. This pickle can be consumed immediately after making it, but tastes best after the second day, when it has had some time to soak in the spices.

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Foodie Monday Blog Hop

This post is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop group that I am part of. Every Monday, the members of this group present recipes based on a pre-determined theme.

The theme this week is #ItsPickleTime, suggested by Aruna who blogs at Vasu’s Veg Kitchen. Aruna has a lovely blog that includes some beautiful, traditional South Indian dishes.

For this week’s theme, all of us are sharing summer-special pickle recipes. I chose to showcase the Instant Indian Hog Plum Pickle that we have grown very fond of, in the last couple of years.

I’m also sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #276.

Nungu Sherbet| Ice Apple Lemonade With Rose

Today, I present to you the recipe for Nungu Sherbet, a delectable juice made using the flesh of the ice apple. Ice apples by themselves are a great thirst quencher, and they are utterly lovely when used in this drink. The combined forces of ice apples, rose and lemon used here make this juice an ultimately refreshing one, simply perfect for the hot days of summer.

Ice apples are an exotic fruit for many across the world, but quite a common summer delight in India. Well, at least in a few parts of India, especially the South, ice apples are hugely popular as a thirst quencher. I like to think of the fruit as nature’s way of making sure that we stay hydrated in the hot days of summer. Called ‘tadgola‘ in Hindi, ‘nungu‘ in Tamil and ‘thati nungu‘ in Kannada, ice apples are actually the fruit of the Palmyra tree.

img_20190513_102344382496995.jpg

The various stages of the ice apple! Top left: A street-side vendor selling bunches of ice apple; Bottom left: A close-up of whole ice apples; Top right: Ice apples, after being extracted from the whole fruit; Bottom right: A peeled ice apple

The most common way of consuming ice apples is by peeling away the thin skin over it and eating the tender flesh inside, raw. Ice apple flesh is also used in making several delicacies in India – Nungu Sherbet, Nungu Paal (milk) and Nungu Payasam (kheer) in Tamil Nadu, for instance, and taal-er-bora or palmyra fritters in Bengal. The sap from the palmyra tree is also consumed – called ‘padhaneer‘ in Tamil. Both the ice apple flesh and the sap are believed to be full of health benefits.

Ice apples can be a pain to peel but, trust me, the gorgeous taste of the fruit is worth every bit of it. Once you have the fruit peeled and ready, it is super easy to make Nungu Sherbet or Ice Apple Lemonade With Rose. I have used home-made rose syrup here, so I can control the amount of sugar and the quality of ingredients going into my sherbet.

Now, without further ado, let’s check out the recipe for this supremely delicious and refreshing Nungu Sherbet!

Ingredients (serves 2):

  1. 4-5 tender ice apples
  2. 1/4 cup rose syrup
  3. About 1-1/2 cups chilled water
  4. Juice of 1/2 lemon

Method:

  1. Peel the ice apples and chop the flesh into cubes. Keep ready.
  2. Take the water in a large mixing bowl. Add in the lemon juice and rose syrup. Mix well.
  3. Pour the rose-lemon water equally into two tall juice glasses.
  4. Top the glasses with the chopped ice apple. Serve immediately.

Notes:

  1. I have used home-made rose syrup to make this Nungu Sherbet. Here’s how I made the rose syrup. You can use a store-bought version instead, too.
  2. You can use a different-flavoured syrup in place of rose syrup too. Nannari (sarsaparilla) syrup, for instance, or khus (vetiver) syrup.
  3. For best results, use ice apples that are tender but a bit firm, not the ones that are overly tender or rock hard. You will find these easier to peel and chop up, to make the Nungu Sherbet.
  4. Use chilled water to make this Nungu Sherbet. I prefer using water that has been chilled in an earthen pot, rather than using refrigerated water.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

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Foodie Monday Blog Hop

This recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop. Every Monday, the participants of this group share recipes based on a pre-determined theme. The theme this week – suggested by Amrita of The Food Samaritan – is #ThirdLetterMagic, wherein all of us have to share a recipe beginning from the third letter of our names. Since my name is Priya, I got the letter ‘I’ and decided to present this Ice Apple Lemonade With Rose.
I’m also sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #275. The co-hosts this week are Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint

Up until I got into full-fledged food blogging, Watermelon & Feta Salad was unheard of to me. Coming from a typical Indian family as I do, salads were something only made with things like, say, moong sprouts or cucumber. Fruits were meant to be eaten as fruits, and the idea of using them in a salad was unheard of. And, feta cheese? What on earth was that? Cheese meant only Amul cheese, little foil-wrapped cubes that came in a box, and were supposed to be picked up off a departmental store shelf. After food blogging happened, though, all of this changed – for the better, I would say.

Food blogging introduced me to a whole new world of food out there, some of which was very different from what I grew up with. It generated in me awareness of just how harmful packaged stuff can be, and taught me to make healthier, more balanced choices. I began to get fascinated with world cuisine, at the same time as huge respect being welling up inside me for the knowledge our ancestors must have possessed, for the way their food was so down to earth, so close to the seasons, so simple. I began to experiment with a lot more ingredients, a lot more dishes – all those lovely-sounding foods I saw on restaurant menus, I started studying and trying to make at home. This Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint is one such thing that I tried at several restaurants, and then learnt to make at home.

I prefer keeping this Watermelon & Feta Salad really simple, using just the most basic of ingredients. I love how the sweet juiciness of the ripe watermelon combines with the creamy saltiness of feta to create an explosion of flavour. I use fresh basil or mint leaves in this salad, depending upon what I can get my hands on, and I love how it adds oomph to it.

This Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint is perfect for the hot days of summer, cooling and refreshing. It can be put together in just a few minutes, once you have the requisite ingredients ready, making for a wonderful mid-morning or evening snack. High in water content and several other nutrients, the low-calorie watermelon is quite filling and makes for the right salad material. Good-quality feta is a relatively low-calorie cheese, again with quite a few nutrients present in it. However, thanks to the relatively high amount of salt in it, it is important to use it in lesser quantities, which works out beautifully in this salad as it is used to even out the sweetness of the watermelon.

Now, without further ado, let’s check out the recipe for this Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint.

Ingredients (serves 2):

  1. 2 heaped cups cubed ripe watermelon, seeds removed
  2. About 1/4 cup of crumbled feta cheese or as per taste
  3. 10 fresh mint leaves

Method:

  1. Take the cubed watermelon in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Add in the crumbled feta cheese.
  3. Roughly tear the mint leaves, using your hands, and add them to the mixing bowl.
  4. Mix up all the ingredients in the mixing bowl gently. Place the salad into two serving plates, and serve immediately.

Notes:

  1. For best results, use ripe, juicy watermelon that is nice and sweet.
  2. Use only the red part of the watermelon, for making this Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint.
  3. Use only good-quality watermelon and feta cheese, for a great-tasting salad.
  4. Adjust the quantity of watermelon and feta cheese as per personal taste preferences.
  5. Make sure the watermelon is thoroughly cleaned, the skin, seeds and rind removed fully.
  6. The fresh mint leaves used in the above recipe can be substituted by fresh basil leaves.
  7. You can add in a drizzle of balsamic vinegar or lemon juice and a dash of salt to the salad, too. I have kept it really basic, though, and have added only the most essential of ingredients.
  8. You may use the seedless version of watermelon to make this salad, so it is easier to clean and use.
  9. This Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint tastes best when made with chilled watermelon. Clean and cube the watermelon, then chill it in the refrigerator for at least an hour before you make this salad.
  10. Serve the Watermelon & Feta Salad With Mint immediately after preparing it. Don’t let it sit around for too long after preparation.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

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Foodie Monday Blog HopThis recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop group that I am part of. Every Monday, a bunch of us food bloggers present recipes for a pre-determined theme.

The theme this Monday is #SummerFruitFest, wherein all of us are cooking dishes using summer-special fruits. The theme was suggested by Swati, who blogs at Food Trails.

I’m sharing this post with Fiesta Friday #274. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com and Liz @ Spades, Spatulas & Spoons.

Anarosher Chaatni| Pineapple Chutney, Bengali Style

A Bengali meal is incomplete without a chutney, especially so on festive occasions. Chutney (rather, ‘Chaatni‘ in the local language) is eaten at the end of a Bengali meal, as a dessert, rather than meaning it to be an accompaniment to the other dishes. It is literally licked off the plate – therefore the name ‘Chaatni‘. And why not? The Bengali Chaatni is, after all, a beautiful medley of flavours sweet and sour with just a hint of spice to keep it intriguing, raisins adding a lovely texture to it. Quite different from the South Indian chutneys we are so used to!

Bengali Chaatnis are also quite intriguing in the sense of what they are made up of. Often, a fruit – think tomato, dried dates, pineapple and mango leather – finds its way into a Chaatni. Then, there’s the one made using raw papaya, called Plastic Chaatni because it resembles shiny plastic in appearance. The recipe I share with you today is for Anarosher Chaatni, pineapple chutney Bengali-style.

We stayed at a hotel in the New Market area of Calcutta, on a holiday there, a few years ago. It was there that we encountered Chaatni for the first-ever time, and whole-heartedly fell in love with. My interest in Bengali cuisine piqued, I would ask the hotel staff about this dish and that. They were kind enough to enlighten me, and even teach me how to make this Anarosher Chaatni and the gorgeous Bengali Bhoger Khichuri.

I recently recreated this Anarosher Chaatni based on recollections of passionate foodie conversations with those hotel staff of a few years past. It was a huge hit, with everyone at home loving it to bits. It was licked clean within minutes – I kid you not! I served it alongside rotis and cabbage sabzi, and it made for a wonderful accompaniment. Spiced with panch phoron, this pineapple chutney, Bengali style, jazzed up our meal like no one’s business!

This chutney is such a simple affair, but an absolute treat to the senses! I have made it with minimal jaggery (rather than sugar) and oil. It is entirely plant-based, vegan and gluten-free by its very nature. Come to think of it, this low-oil Anarosher Chaatni would make for a relatively healthy vegan dessert treat as well!

Let us now check out the recipe for this Pineapple Chutney, Bengali Style, shall we?

Ingredients (makes 1 cup):

  1. 1 heaped cup of chopped ripe pineapple, thorns removed
  2. 2 teaspoons oil
  3. 1 teaspoon panch phoron or Bengali five-spice mix
  4. 2 small bay leaves
  5. 2 dried red chillies
  6. 1 tablespoon raisins
  7. A pinch of salt
  8. 2 tablespoons jaggery powder or to taste
  9. A dash of red chilli powder or to taste
  10. 1 teaspoon roasted cumin powder

Method:

1. Take the chopped pineapple in a large, wide vessel. Add in a little water. Place the vessel in a pressure cooker and cook for 3 whistles on high flame. Switch off gas and allow the pressure to come down naturally.

2. Allow the cooked pineapple to cool down fully. Then, grind it coarsely in a mixer, along with the water it was cooked in.

3. Heat the oil in a pan. Add in the panch phoron, dried red chillies and bay leaves. Let the ingredients stay in for a couple of seconds.

4. To the pan, add the coarse pineapple puree. Add salt, red chilli powder, raisins and jaggery powder. Mix well.

5. Turn the flame down to medium. Cook the mixture on medium flame till the chutney thickens slightly, 3-4 minutes. Switch off gas when it is still quite runny, for it thickens further on cooling.

6. Allow the chutney to cool down fully before transferring it to a clean, dry, air-tight box. Store refrigerated.

Notes:

1. Panch phoron is a Bengali-style mix of five spices – cumin, mustard, fennel, fenugreek and nigella seeds. You can make your own panch phoron or buy a ready-to-use packet – it is commonly available in most departmental stores. I use a store-bought version that I am quite happy with.

2. A lot of Bengali families use sugar in their chaatni. I have used jaggery here, instead, to make the dish healthier.

3. Adjust the quantity of sugar/jaggery depending upon how sweet the pineapple is.

4. Adjust the quantity of red chilli powder, salt and other spices as per personal taste preferences.

5. For best results, use a ripe, juicy, sweet pineapple that is not overly sour. Make sure all thorns are removed before using the pineapple in the Anarosher Chaatni.

6. I have coarsely pulsed the cooked pineapple here, so I got a mix of puree and pieces of the fruit. This lent a very interesting texture to the chaatni. You could keep the pineapple pieces whole or make a fine puree, as you please.

7. Make sure the pineapple is cooked fully, before using it in making the chaatni.

8. Switch off the gas when the Anarosher Chaatni is still quite runny. It is supposed to be runny, and thickens a bit on cooling as well.

9. I have used refined oil to make the Anarosher Chaatni, as opposed to the pungent mustard oil that is typically used in most Bengali cooking.

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Foodie Monday Blog Hop

This post is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop, a Facebook group that I am part of. Every Monday, a bunch of us food bloggers present dishes based on a pre-determined theme.

The theme this week is #BengaliFoodFest, wherein we are cooking dishes from the vast Bengali cuisine. The theme was suggested by Sujata Roy, who writes at Batter Up With Sujata.

I’m also sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #273. The co-host this week is Mollie @ The Frugal Hausfrau.

Safed Dhokla| Gujarati White Dhokla Using Idli Batter

Today, I present to you the recipe for a Gujarati snack that goes by the name of Safed Dhokla (literally ‘white dhokla‘ in the local language). Before I get to the recipe, though, here’s a little rant.

Dhokla‘ and ‘Khaman‘ are perhaps the most misrepresented dishes in Indian cuisine. The terms are often used interchangeably, but the two dishes are definitely not the same. Both ‘Dhokla‘ and ‘Khaman‘ are Gujarati snacks which are cooked by way of steaming, but there’s a world of difference between them!

Let me explain.

Dhokla‘ is typically made using a rice-and-uraddaal batter. They are usually white in colour, and are generally not sweet.

Khaman‘ is made from gram flour (besan) or ground chana daal. They are yellow in colour, and can sometimes be sweet and sour.

When the basic ingredients used in the preparation of the two things are so different, you can imagine how different in taste they would be, right?

Now, there are several different versions of both – the ‘Dhokla‘ and the ‘Khaman‘. Different regions of Gujarat, different families, make them in different ways. I hope you got the basic differences between the two, though. On my blog, I have earlier shared the recipe for making instant Khaman using besan. I have also shared a recipe for Amiri Khaman, a chaat of sorts using leftover Khaman.

OK, rant over. Gyaan disbursed. Now, let me tell you about the Safed Dhokla I was about to tell you about.

Safed Dhokla, also called Idada or Idra, is one of the types of Dhokla commonly made in Gujarat, using idli batter. If you have idli batter on hand, it is a breeze to prepare these dhokla. They taste absolutely lovely, and are a highly nutritious snack to boot. Since they are steam-cooked, very little oil goes into them, making them perfect for weight-watchers. At the end of this post, I have suggested a few different variations to the Safed Dhokla that you can try out, so you get a different-tasting snack every time you make it! In the picture below is the most basic style of Safed Dhokla – tempered with just mustard seeds and fresh coriander. Safed Dhokla is a completely plant-based, vegan dish. In itself, this is a gluten-free dish as well.

Here’s the recipe for basic Safed Dhokla!

Ingredients (makes 10-12 dhokla):

  1. 2 cups well fermented and salted idli batter
  2. 1 tablespoon oil for tempering + a little more for greasing the steaming vessel
  3. 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  4. Finely chopped coriander, as needed to garnish

Method:

  1. Firstly, grease the bottom and sides of a large, wide vessel well with some oil.
  2. Pour the fermented batter into the greased vessel, and keep it ready.
  3. Pour about 1-1/2 cups of water in a pressure cooker bottom and place it on high flame. When the water comes to a boil, place a stand inside the cooker and place the greased vessel with the batter on top of it. Close the pressure cooker lid. Steam on high flame for 10 minutes, without putting the whistle on. Switch off gas.
  4. Let the Safed Dhokla rest for 2-3 minutes more after switching off the gas, then take out the steaming vessel.
  5. Now, we will make the tempering for the Safed Dhokla. Heat a tablespoon of oil and add in 1 teaspoon of mustard seeds. Let them sputter. Pour this tempering evenly over the steamed dhokla. Garnish the dhokla with finely chopped fresh coriander as needed. Cut into pieces and serve hot or at room temperature.

Notes:

1. The idli batter should be thick and not watery, for best results.

2. Make sure the idli batter is well fermented before you begin making the Safed Dhokla.

3. Since the idli batter is already salted, we will not be adding salt to it again before making the Safed Dhokla.

4. Do not overcook the dhokla, otherwise they will become hard and rubbery. Just about 10 minutes after the water in the cooker has come to a boil is good.

5. I use homemade idli batter to make these dhokla. You can also use store-bought batter instead, too.

6. I steam the Safed Dhokla in a large, 7.5-litre pressure cooker.

7. If you so desire, you can add in 1/2 teaspoon of Eno Fruit Salt (plain) or baking soda to the batter just before placing it in the cooker for steaming. This makes sure the dhokla turn out very soft and fluffy. I usually don’t – well-fermented, fresh idli batter is enough to yield spongy dhokla.

8. For best results, make the Safed Dhokla within 2-3 days of grinding/buying the idli batter.

9. You can add about 1/2 cup of thick, sour curd to the idli batter and let it rest for 15-20 minutes before making the dhokla. I typically don’t do this.

Variations:

  1. You can add in some chopped green chillies and garlic cloves while grinding the batter. This will yield garlicky, slightly spicy dhokla that are super delicious!
  2. Add in a bit of asafoetida, some finely chopped green chillies, some fresh grated coconut and some sesame (til) to the tempering. This will make the dhokla even more flavourful.
  3. Just before placing the batter in the pressure cooker for steaming, drizzle some red chilli powder on top. This will add a zing to the dhoklas!
  4. You can also drizzle some black pepper powder on top, just before placing the batter in the pressure cooker for steaming.
  5. Some grated carrot and/or beetroot can also be added into the batter, to make the dhokla more nutritious.

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Foodie Monday Blog Hop

This recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop group that I am part of. Every Monday, a bunch of us food bloggers get together and cook dishes based on a pre-determined theme.

The theme this week is #OneSpiceIngredient, suggested by Sasmita of First-Timer Cook. Participants are sharing dishes that use only one spice ingredient. For the theme, I chose to share this Gujarati White Dhokla Recipe that I have tempered with just one spice – mustard.

I’m also sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #272. The co-hosts this week are Antonia @ Zoale.com.

Do try this recipe out some time! I’d love to know what you think about it!

Moraiya Ni Khichdi| Samai Arisi Khichdi

Growing up in Ahmedabad, I would turn up my nose in disdain whenever the word ‘khichdi’ was mentioned. For me, ‘Khichdi‘ translated into boring, bland food that was for the sick or the elderly. Khichdi for lunch or dinner meant a lacklustre meal that I had no interest in consuming. And, then, one fine day, one of my Gujarati friends introduced me to Moraiya Ni Khichdi, a dish made with ‘moraiyo‘, the local name for barnyard millet. I fell for the delicious khichdi hook, line and sinker and the rest, as they say, is history. It remains a favourite of mine till date.

Moraiyo or Moriyo in Gujarati, Samak Ke Chawal or Sama Ke Chawal, Samai Arisi in Tamil, the barnyard millet goes by so many names. As it is technically not a grain, it is commonly used in the preparation of food during fasts, particularly so in Gujarat, Rajasthan, Maharashtra and surrounding parts. This is why you will also find it referred to as ‘Vrat Ke Chawal‘ (literally ‘the rice that you can consume during fasts’ in Northern India. Moraiyo is a very versatile ingredient too, lending itself beautifully to khichdi, kheer, dhokla and tikkis alike. It is gluten-free as well.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Moraiya Ni Khichdi or Samai Arisi Khichdi, the way my friend taught me all those years ago. It is a delicious confection, potatoes and peanuts added to it for flavour, scented by ginger and green chillies, coriander and curry leaves, soured with curd. The Gujaratis refer to this dish as ‘Farali Khichdi‘, i.e. khichdi that can be eaten during fasting. I’m sure you will love this khichdi too, fast or no fast!

A little goes a long way, as far as moraiyo or barnyard millet is concerned. Use just 1/2 cup of the millet, and it will yield enough khichdi to generously serve two. The husband loves Moraiya Ni Khichdi too, and I make it often for breakfast or dinner. It is quite light on the stomach and easily digestible, perfect for the hot, hot, hot days prevailing in Bangalore right about now. What’s more, the little grain cooks super fast too. Tell me what is not to love, with this khichdi? 🙂

Now, without further ado, here’s the recipe for Moraiya Ni Khichdi or Samai Arisi Khichdi.

Ingredients (serves 2):

  1. 1/2 cup moraiyo aka sama rice (samai arisi)
  2. 1 medium-sized potato (urulai kizhangu)
  3. 2 tablespoons raw peanuts (kadalai)
  4. 1 tablespoon oil (ennai)
  5. 1 teaspoon cumin (jeeragam) seeds
  6. 4 green chillies (pacha milagai)
  7. 2-3 dry red chillies (vara milagai)
  8. A 1-inch piece of ginger (inji)
  9. 1 sprig of curry leaves (karuvepillai)
  10. Rock salt to taste (kallu uppu)
  11. About 3/4 cup sour curd (thayir)
  12. 1/2 cup + 2-1/2 cup water (neeru)
  13. 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh coriander (kothamalli)

Method:

1. Dry roast the peanuts till crisp. Take care to ensure that they do not burn. When they cool down completely, coarsely crush them in a mixer. Don’t make a fine powder. Keep aside.

2. Peel the ginger and chop very finely. Keep aside.

3. Cut each green chilly into two, and slit length-wise. Keep aside.

4. Peel the potato and grate thick. Keep aside.

5. Wash the sama rice in running water a couple of times, draining out the excess water. Keep aside.

6. Now, heat the oil in a pan. Add the cumin seeds and allow them to stay in for a couple of seconds. Add the finely chopped ginger, curry leaves and dry red chillies. Let them stay in for a couple of seconds.

7. Add the grated potatoes to the pan, along with a little salt and 1/2 cup water. Cook on medium flame till the potatoes are done, 1-2 minutes.

8. Now, add the remaining 2-1/2 cups of water to the pan, along with salt to taste and slit green chillies. Let it come to a boil.

9. Add the washed and drained sama rice to the pan. Keeping the flame medium, cook till the sama rice is completely done. This should take about 2 minutes. You will need to keep stirring constantly, to ensure that no lumps are formed.

10. Now, keeping the flame medium, add the sour curd to the pan. Mix well, and let the mixture cook on medium flame for a minute more. Stir intermittently. Switch off gas while the Moraiya Ni Khichdi is still runny, as it will thicken on cooling.

11. Serve immediately, garnished with finely chopped coriander and roasted, crushed peanuts.

Notes:

  1. You can adjust the amount of water and buttermilk, depending upon the consistency of the Moraiya Ni Khichdi you require.
  2. If the khichdi has become too hard on cooling, you can add in a bit more water and/or curd, and reheat it. It will loosen.
  3. Samai Arisi Khichdi is best served hot, when it is still runny.
  4. In this recipe, I have used only ingredients that are ‘allowed’ during fasting in a Gujarati household – rock salt, peanuts, buttermilk, cumin, ginger, green chillies and the like, with no asafoetida added in. If you plan to prepare this Samai Arisi Khichdi on a fasting day, please ensure that you use ingredients in accordance with the customs and traditions prevailing for the fast in your household. On a regular day, you can use common table salt instead of rock salt and add in asafoetida in the tempering too.
  5. This khichdi can also be made without the potatoes. Just skip the potatoes in that case, keeping the rest of the proceedure the same as above.
  6. You can also use ghee for the tempering, instead of oil.
  7. I have used home-made curd in the above Moraiya Ni Khichdi recipe, which is preferred on a fasting day. On a regular day, you may use store-bought curd instead.
  8. For best results, use curd that is sour but not overly so.

Did you like this recipe? Do tell me, in your comments!

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Foodie Monday Blog Hop

This recipe is for the Foodie Monday Blog Hop, a Facebook group that I am part of. Every Monday, a bunch of us food bloggers get together and cook for a pre-determined theme. The theme this week, suggested by me, is #DahiDelights, wherein all of us will be showcasing dishes made using curd.

I’m sharing this recipe with Fiesta Friday #271. Ai @ Ai Made It For You is the co-host this week.